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Go Back   DCSportbikes.net > Sportbike Operation > Test and Tune

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  (#1)
DT
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Posts: 2,147
Join Date: June 24, 2004
Location: NYDB
November 4, 2004, 10:03 AM

I've done the search and read all of the tire pressure recommendations for your tires when riding on the street. I am running mine too high as I ran off of the recommended PSI's on the swingarm (36/42). I did not realize that your tires inflate up to 3 more psi when warm. That would explain the stiff ride yesterday and lack of stability while in the turns.

I was talking to EduardoSuave, DeviousR6, and Dayuiz yesterday, and got a few tips off of them, but my question still remains:

If you have to measure tires when cold, and adjust when cold - how long does it take to "heat up" (to the point where you cannot correctly adjust the pressure) on my Dunlop 208's??? Now Ed brought up the point about the obvious - distance to gas station (3/4 of a mile), amount of hard braking (not that much, only 3 lights until station), speed (average 30-40mph) and temperature both outside and that of the road of course (current conditions - check your nearest window).

So do I need to go buy a pump and adjust in my garage, or do I have to go to the gas station and wait for an hour for my 3/4 of a mile tires to "cool down???"

I've read the posts on recommended tire pressures and will adjust my tires now accordingly. Only thing is - where and how do I do so??

Do you old guys have your own pumps???


04 600RR - SOLD

"I am a soldier, I fight where I am told, and I win where I fight."
- General George Patton Jr
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  (#2)
GP Champ
 
Posts: 2,839
Join Date: November 12, 2002
Location: Woodbridge, VA
November 4, 2004, 10:18 AM

I kept my M1's at 36/36. They heat up very quick. It's about 2-3 miles to the local gas station that has a free air pump. There's one closer but I'm not paying .$50 to put air in my tires. Average speed around 45-50 and they stayed at 36/36 when I got to the pump. I wouldn't worry about traveling less than a mile and having to wait for the tires to cool down. Dunlop 208's take forever to warm up and cool down quickly. I only had to put air in my tires a couple times over 5k miles. The M1's kept their pressure very good.


Katie 135
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  (#3)
Licensed Rider
 
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Posts: 123
Join Date: September 26, 2004
Location: gambrills , md
November 4, 2004, 11:29 AM

this is a good ? , i run 33-34 pounds in the rear and 31-32 in the front , some say thats to low , im not sure i always thought that to be a good psi . i do get some wiggle in the rear of the bike when leaned over hard , im going to try 35-36 in the rear this weekend and 33-34 in the front see if that helps the wiggle or if i need to adjust my body positioning . always learning something .


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  (#4)
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Posts: 123
Join Date: September 26, 2004
Location: gambrills , md
November 4, 2004, 11:31 AM

also it only take a few mins for the air in your tires to cool .


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  (#5)
BOOOORING
 
Posts: 917
Join Date: October 18, 2002
November 4, 2004, 11:52 AM

The pressure you are running should depend on the street and track, but I used to run 30/30 cold on both my street bikes.

the amount of time it takes to heat them up will depend on a lot of things. Things like air temp, ground temp, type of riding you are doing. Remember, only braking and accelerating will heat up your tire. Moving side to side generates no heat.

The less air pressure you run the more grip you will have, but you will also get less life out of your tire. Your tire will heat up and cool off differently denpending on the brand of tire you have. Michelins take a while to heat up, but cool down slowly. Pirelli heats up quickly and cools down VERY quickly. You just need to weigh how much grip you need for the riding you are doing. If you are straight shooting just to and from work... run your pressure a little higher.

Each tire pressure will be different depending on the tire brand as well. Pirelli tends to work better at a low PSI than michelin or Dunlop. Because of the profile of the tire, and compound, the tire will give you different responses at different pressures.

To answer your question specifically... Donlup 208's on a 600RR for really good trackion I would run 30/31 cold on the street, and 28/29 cold on the track. If I was just commuting and not doing any hard riding... maybe 32/34 but no higher. You should try a setting and see what works for you. Everything about you and your bike will make the tire react differently, ie, I don't weigh that much so I run a little bit softer in the rear to give me more grip.

But... I do come from a racing backgroud and I am giving you information from that persective. I have run and track on the street with every major tire manufacture, but mine is just one opinion.


Cornerspeed Riders School & Cornerspin School-"Roadracing in the Dirt"
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  (#6)
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Posts: 9,771
Join Date: October 4, 2002
Location: NoVA
November 4, 2004, 04:01 PM

i run Metzeler M1s, 31/31 for street.
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  (#7)
boxing twins
 
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Posts: 581
Join Date: April 6, 2003
Location: Northern California
November 4, 2004, 04:14 PM

Don't forget that tire pressures have an effect on your suspension setup. Tires are rubber and filled with air, and behave like springs. The lower the tire pressure, the more the tire will deform. So, lower tire pressure equals lower tire spring rate, and therefore provide less compression and rebound dampening.

Once you've got your suspension setup for your weight and riding style, reduce tire pressures to increase grip, bearing in mind it will soften your suspension setup slightly. You will find an air pressure so low that your suspension feels 'floaty' and lacks feel. Increase the pressure a few PSI.

As tires age, you have the inverse: old tires deform less due to vulcanization (rubber hardening). Therefore, you have to reduce your suspension compression and rebound dampening to compensate for the hardening tires.

For those of you with non-adjustable suspensions: combine tire pressures with fork oil weight (5/10/15, higher is more dampening), fork oil level (less air is more dampening), and spacers under the fork caps to add spring preload, to adjust your suspension. Use tire pressures as the fine tuning element.

JP:


-- Chris
BMW R1100s
(previous rides: '82 KTM250, '95 CBR600F3, '98 Buell S3T, 2000 Hayabusa, 2008 R1200R)

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  (#8)
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Posts: 71
Join Date: August 16, 2004
Location: Silver Spring, MD
November 4, 2004, 06:01 PM

I keep an electric tire pump in my car that runs off the cigarette lighter. Some Sears Craftsman pump you can buy for like $30. Since my bike is always parked next to my car, it's pretty convenient. No cooling period necessary.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DT
I've done the search and read all of the tire pressure recommendations for your tires when riding on the street. I am running mine too high as I ran off of the recommended PSI's on the swingarm (36/42). I did not realize that your tires inflate up to 3 more psi when warm. That would explain the stiff ride yesterday and lack of stability while in the turns.

I was talking to EduardoSuave, DeviousR6, and Dayuiz yesterday, and got a few tips off of them, but my question still remains:

If you have to measure tires when cold, and adjust when cold - how long does it take to "heat up" (to the point where you cannot correctly adjust the pressure) on my Dunlop 208's??? Now Ed brought up the point about the obvious - distance to gas station (3/4 of a mile), amount of hard braking (not that much, only 3 lights until station), speed (average 30-40mph) and temperature both outside and that of the road of course (current conditions - check your nearest window).

So do I need to go buy a pump and adjust in my garage, or do I have to go to the gas station and wait for an hour for my 3/4 of a mile tires to "cool down???"

I've read the posts on recommended tire pressures and will adjust my tires now accordingly. Only thing is - where and how do I do so??

Do you old guys have your own pumps???


I'm not psychic. People are just predictable.

Corn. Enjoy it for a second time.
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