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  (#1)
Ex-racer TURNED Post Whore
 
KatiesGSXR600m's Avatar
 
Posts: 3,176
Join Date: September 29, 2002
Location: Northern Virginia
June 4, 2004, 09:34 AM

Ok....
so I have had this discussion in person with a few experts but I figure posting it would benefit others as well.

I left my bike lights on for an extended period of time draining all life out of the battery. This being a Honda and all, mind you.

Kepi, being the awesome friend that he is, helped me try to push start it more than a few times which just wasn't working. So we jumped it off his bike with some cables....it started up fine but didn't keep the charge right away until we jumped it a few more times....rode it for over and hour and then it kept the charge

HOWEVER, I was told that Honda has a different "charging" system...
apparently it's a generator and it isn't like an alternator or whatever...

So, it would be bad if I rode around on a jumped battery because it could burn up the generator??

SO I need to put it on a CHRISTIE (sp) to test and charge it to see if it is good enough

or I have to buy a brand new battery...

Can anyone clarify this and use the correct terms...shed some light....enlighten me on some facts...whatever...

I am sure I confused some of it..but you know what I mean...spell it out for me.


Honda Cbr600RR NESBA #135
"Your anger makes me Happy"
Ambivalent? Welllll, yes and no.
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  (#2)
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Join Date: October 1, 2002
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June 4, 2004, 10:31 AM

generators and alternators both take mechanical energy and convert it into electricity. apparently, according to dictionary.com, alternators produce alternating current (like in your house).

as far as your bike is concerned, you should be fine riding with your bike on a "jumped" battery. when you jump start a bike/car, you are allowing the dead bike to mooch the power needed to start the dead bike from tehnew bike. once the bike is started, the charging system of the bike will charge the battery (if the charging system and battery are in good condition). Jumping a bike only starts it, it does not charge the battery.

You are in no danger of hurting your generator by using a jumped battery. The generator puts out quite a lot of power to run the bike (ignition, spark plugs, dash, headlights) as well as keep the battery charged. your generator will continue to operate like this whether your battery is good or not.

I doubt you would need to get your battery tested (i am not sure what this christie thing is), but for piece of mind, it might be worth it.

If your bike starts now after you have ridden it for a while, everrything should be fine.

i apologize for the dis-jointed response, but i am a bit hung over and quite tired.
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  (#3)
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June 4, 2004, 10:37 AM

I understand the concept of jumping and such...but I did ask you to spell it out for me, didn't I Thanks
So you are telling me there is no difference between the way a Honda and a gixxer or yammi charge their batteries?

What I meant was, I spoke with someone who said Honda's have a different setup than any other bike. I was just wondering if anyone knew what exactly is different and how. He did explain it to me but I wanted to see it written out and in specifics.


Honda Cbr600RR NESBA #135
"Your anger makes me Happy"
Ambivalent? Welllll, yes and no.
You are about as useful as a poopy flavored lollipop!
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  (#4)
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June 4, 2004, 10:59 AM

after a quick search online, i fond no reference to the 600RR having a different or special charging system. possibly it is not a 12 volt system (unlikely), or maybe it uses alternating current vs. direct current or vice versa (highly unlikely).

i dont think you have anything to worry about. just go out and ride, and dont forget to turn your bike off when you uare done.
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  (#5)
Fuzz Runna
 
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June 4, 2004, 01:31 PM

I know that on a Zuk, if the battery goes flat dead, even if you push start it, it would take forever to charge the battery back with the bike..as in DAYS at a medium speed. The thing is, the faster you go, the more juice you use, the slower you go, the less juice you make, so then you've got to find that happy medium that your bike makes enough to use for the bike, and charge, but not too fast that it uses more than it makes all together, and doesn't charge the battery. The reason I know this is from experience, so no funny faces. I'm pretty sure I read somewhere that bikes don't even start making enough to charge the battery until over like 2,800 RPM...but don't quote me. And obviously anything too much below that speed, and the bike will be leaning on the battery to stay alive. So, best bet, if your battery is completely dead (ie sitting in garage for 2 or 3 months without starting) let it charge for a few days on a trickle charger..maybe 1 to 2 amp charge. This should bring it back to life.


Just my .02......may not be worth .01



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  (#6)
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June 4, 2004, 01:56 PM

Hey Katie - Do you have a trickle charger? If you need one, I have one you can borrow.


“People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.”
-George Orwell


CCS Amateur #588
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  (#7)
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Join Date: September 29, 2002
Location: VA
June 4, 2004, 03:27 PM

Current bikes all use the same type of charging system. A stator/generator creates AC power. The AC power passes through the regulator/rectifier where it is converted to DC powered so it can be used by the lights, ignition, computers, etc. The regulator/rectifier also regulates the charging voltage of the battery. Most bikes produce on average 14 volts while running at normal road speeds. Factory service manuals contain a chart that show what voltage is produced at a given rpm. Voltage is generally not proportional to rpm. After a given rpm the voltage drops off or remains steady so as not to overcharge the battery.

Because new bikes now have F.I. computers to run, they are harder to keep running with a weak battery compared to a bike with carbs which can use all the electrical power for the ignition coils.

A couple years ago I watched sometime try to bump start a VFR800. Total PITA. One more reason I like my bikes with carbs.

Katie, you're battery is fine and will be fine as long as you don't do a lot of stopping and starting. A few solid hours of riding at a time for a couple of days will take care of it.


'08 MARRC Expert Racer of the Year
2009 #3 Combined Overall Championship

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  (#8)
boxing twins
 
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Join Date: April 6, 2003
Location: Northern California
June 4, 2004, 06:10 PM

Fuel injected bikes need some battery power to turn the fuel pump to pressurize the fuel rails and drive the fuel injectors.

No battery power on an FI bike = no fuel

When a battery discharges completely, sulfates collect on the cells reducing the battery's electrical storage capacity. Lead-acid batteries can only be completely discharged a few times before they'll no longer hold a charge.

Whenever possible, charge a dead battery as slowly as possible, commonly referred to as "trickle charging". Rapid charging (ex: jumping) shortens battery life.

Katie: Your battery is probably fine, but if you drain it completely again, you might have to replace it.


-- Chris
BMW R1100s
(previous rides: '82 KTM250, '95 CBR600F3, '98 Buell S3T, 2000 Hayabusa, 2008 R1200R)

"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." -- Arthur C. Clarke
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