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Waking up my bike from a very long slumber
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GP Champ
 
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Posts: 2,662
Join Date: January 12, 2011
Location: Woodbridge, VA
Waking up my bike from a very long slumber - May 9, 2019, 04:29 PM

I am just now waking up my bike from around 4 years of storage inside my garage. I’m asking for technical guidance on the “should do’s” of getting it back to proper working order. I’m looking for viable alternatives like: condition the old gas vs syphon the old gas vs drain tank and clean it vs just let it run until it’s out of gas completely then refill like normal, etc. Same line of question for things like oil, suspension, coolant, brakes, etc.

Bike: 2003 GSX-R750
Shortly before it went into storage mode the following was done:
Oil Change
New Tires
New Front Brake Pads (still have to install rear)
TODAY I just installed a brand new battery

Please guys, don’t recommend I get a new bike. I still want this bike because I love it. It’s not cause of money. I’d pick my bike over a current year one mostly for comfort and it feels great to me.

Thanks in advance to all.
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Location: Springfield, VA
May 10, 2019, 05:08 AM

Definitely get rid of the gas that's in there. I bought a Ninja1000 that had been sitting for well over a year and while the bike would run, it pinged like crazy with any kind of load on it. Drained and put in some 93 and it ran great. I would not waste money on replacing the oil since you changed it before storage.

Check tire pressure. Tires may be a bit flat spotted from sitting even though they're new. Maybe that will work itself out when you go for a ride. They're not likely to be in bad shape since they've been in your garage, but they're also worth checking for cracks. If they're supersport tires they probably don't have the grip they did when you spooned them on, so it's a bad time to rail.

The T-CLOCS checklist would be a good place to start for the rest:

https://www.msf-usa.org/downloads/T-..._Checklist.pdf

Also, definitely get a new bike.


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Waking up my bike from a very long slumber
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Waking up my bike from a very long slumber - May 10, 2019, 10:05 AM

You might want to look at doing the brake fluid as well. I would because it deteriorates due to time as much as use. This would be particularly true if you can’t remember the last time it was done.

Definitely do the coolant too if it is over 6 years old now.


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May 10, 2019, 03:59 PM

Honestly, I would just dump and flush all the fluids.
I just did a 6 year sit restore, and can tell you without a doubt all the fluids looked broken down.
brake, clutch, coolent flush and replace, then dump and replace the oil and gas. All and all our only out like 40 or 50 bucks here doing it yourself. 60 if you go with a synthetic and a new filter.
Check the brake pads, and spin the wheel through making sure nothing is sticking.
lube chain and wheel bearings
You already swapped the battery which was a good decision, but I wouldn't run those ties if it sat on them for 4 years without moving. If you have the money to spend you can grab a set front and rear off amazon shipped for under 200.
Besides that do a visual check of the hoses.
I really don't think you will need to touch anything else.

Good luck!
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May 11, 2019, 01:31 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinko View Post
Honestly, I would just dump and flush all the fluids.
I just did a 6 year sit restore, and can tell you without a doubt all the fluids looked broken down.
brake, clutch, coolent flush and replace, then dump and replace the oil and gas. All and all our only out like 40 or 50 bucks here doing it yourself. 60 if you go with a synthetic and a new filter.
Check the brake pads, and spin the wheel through making sure nothing is sticking.
lube chain and wheel bearings
You already swapped the battery which was a good decision, but I wouldn't run those ties if it sat on them for 4 years without moving. If you have the money to spend you can grab a set front and rear off amazon shipped for under 200.
Besides that do a visual check of the hoses.
I really don't think you will need to touch anything else.

Good luck!
What he said


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Waking up my bike from a very long slumber
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Waking up my bike from a very long slumber - May 11, 2019, 12:37 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinko View Post
Honestly, I would just dump and flush all the fluids.
I just did a 6 year sit restore, and can tell you without a doubt all the fluids looked broken down.
brake, clutch, coolent flush and replace, then dump and replace the oil and gas. All and all our only out like 40 or 50 bucks here doing it yourself. 60 if you go with a synthetic and a new filter.
Check the brake pads, and spin the wheel through making sure nothing is sticking.
lube chain and wheel bearings
You already swapped the battery which was a good decision, but I wouldn't run those ties if it sat on them for 4 years without moving. If you have the money to spend you can grab a set front and rear off amazon shipped for under 200.
Besides that do a visual check of the hoses.
I really don't think you will need to touch anything else.

Good luck!


Perfect! Thank you! The bike sat lifted off the ground the entire time so tires shouldn’t have flat spots. Plus being in relatively stable weather conditions I’m hoping they’ll still perform solid after a few hundred miles ridden carefully. And it’ll take some time for me to rail on it since I need to be comfortable and confident on the bike again first.

About the fluids, it’s a gixxer, correct me if I’m wrong please. The fluids to replace are just Gas / Brake / Oil / Coolant ... is that right?

Also about the “flush”, I know in cars a flush means that you actually clean something out with a special machine before you put new fluids. So in your recommendation did you mean ‘flush and clean’, or just ‘empty and replace’?

Thanks for the reminder on lube for the chain, sprockets, and wheels. In my mind I was thinking about just cleaning them and forgot about the lube.


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Waking up my bike from a very long slumber
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Waking up my bike from a very long slumber - May 11, 2019, 12:41 PM

As for everyone else.... I don’t know how to multi-quote using this app. But I do want to say thank you for the guidance. Especially on the recommendation to get a new bike. Smartass! LOL But I will pull up that checklist that was suggested as well.


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May 13, 2019, 12:03 PM

@nootherides
By flush, I really mean don't let some out and just top off.
For the brakes and clutch take the drain tip off plug on a 1/4" x 24" long clear drain tube (these are like 2$ from advanced auto and put a can below it. Start pumping the brake till it starts squirting. Then while its squirting out keep the tube in the fluid (BELOW the fluid level) so you get no air returned back in there. Keep adding fluid slowly while pumping. It will force all the old fluid out until you get the new clean fluid come out. Cap the reservoir and make sure you still have pressure and didn't get any air in the lines.
This is the same for both clutch and front and rear brakes.
Coolant, you drain, then I take an air compressor and blow it out. Make sure you don't use some dirty ass old compressor. You don't want to blowing dust and junk in there. I take a compressor and a damp cloth and wrap it around the end to get a more air tight connection at the top so that the entire system is blown out. When you refill, once it looks like its at the top level, squeeze the hoses by hand a couple of times to get the air bubbles out, you will see the coolant stop bubbling eventually from the refill port. Top it off and then check the reservoir to make sure its at the correct level as well. You should ride and recheck it... but honestly if you did the above you should be good.
For Oil just get the bike warmed up for a couple minutes then dump it, and change as you normally would along with the filter. For bikes that have sit for a LONG time, don't even run it, dump the oil then put some cheap ass oil in there run it and dump it again. that's what I had to do, but I don't think you will need to go this route.

If your tires were off the ground and were in controlled climate, you may be okay. I personally would just not feel as comfortable riding hard on old tires I was unsure of. I like to know if I fuck up it was my fault not because something went wrong on the bike. Sucks really bad to go down just because of something you could have fixed before hand.

But if you want to keep them and they look good, no splitting at all in the side walls, and still sticky (not hard) take it out for a ride and make sure there isn't any wobble at slow speeds. Then start slow leans and again make sure there is no bonce or wobble before taking it up to any real speed.

Either way Good luck!
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