DCSportbikes.net  
» Help Support .NET!
DCSportbikes Premier Membership for 25$ per year. Discounts! Click here for full information.

Now available in the .NET Shop:



Get your DCSBN Gear!
» Shoutbox
Sorry, only registered users have the ability to use our real-time shoutbox to chat with other members.

Register now, it's free!
» Online Users: 499
2 members and 497 guests
2blueyam, beatle
Most users ever online was 4,519, September 2, 2015 at 03:26 AM.
Go Back   DCSportbikes.net > Sportbike Operation > Riding Tips

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools
Body Position/Cornering
Unread
  (#1)
Solid; Jive Turkey...
 
K-DUB's Avatar
 
Posts: 130
Join Date: March 20, 2010
Location: WV
Lightbulb Body Position/Cornering - March 31, 2011, 01:25 PM

Not to shabby of a vid, but I think Michael Neeves simply explains it well.


YouTube - Body Positioning when cornering


Stay Thirsty My Friend...
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#2)
GP Champ
 
Leoallafila's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,479
Join Date: December 15, 2010
Location: Alexandria, VA
March 31, 2011, 01:43 PM

As always with MCN they half ass things (and thir video production team sucks, the whole time you can hear the leathers of the guy squeaking... Looks like an amateur video!). The position he explained is generally correct, but you want to add that when moving your body to the right or to the left you need to do so using mainly the leg that lies under you: if you want to lean right, lift your weight to adjust your position with the right leg, and rest any weight that you cannot rest on the seat alone on that same leg as you approach the corner, that will load your front tire giving you more grip as you enter the corner.

At the apex you will do the opposite, applying gradually more pressure/weight on the outer peg/leg in order to transfer traction and stability to the rear tire. Teaching people to do this on the track always got me amazed stares of enlightenment.

The real challenge is to make it into a natural movement without having to think about it.


2011 Ducati Diavel Chromo (Current)
2007 BMW R1200GS Adventure (Current)
2006 BMW R1200ST
2003 BMW K1200GT (Current)
2004 Ducati 998s Final Edition (Current)
1997 Aprilia RS250
1998 BMW K1200RS
2000 Ducati 998
1998 Pegaso 650
1999 Ducati 996S
2004 BMW R1150R
2005 Aprilia RSVR Factory
2001 Triumph Tiger 955i
2002 Yamaha FZ1
2006 Buell Ulysses
1991 Suzuki GSX-1100R
1991 Honda Africa Twin 750
2008 Mobster Lefty Trophy pitbike
2004 Aprilia RSVR Factory
1990 Aprilia Pegaso 125
1991 Ducati 888
1995 Honda CR250
1996 Aprilia RS125
1995 Aprilia Sr 50
1984 Kram-it 50
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#3)
...
 
n0showjustg0's Avatar
 
Posts: 392
Join Date: July 4, 2010
Location: Northern VA
March 31, 2011, 01:51 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leoallafila View Post
As always with MCN they half ass things (and thir video production team sucks, the whole time you can hear the leathers of the guy squeaking... Looks like an amateur video!). The position he explained is generally correct, but you want to add that when moving your body to the right or to the left you need to do so using mainly the leg that lies under you: if you want to lean right, lift your weight to adjust your position with the right leg, and rest any weight that you cannot rest on the seat alone on that same leg as you approach the corner, that will load your front tire giving you more grip as you enter the corner.

At the apex you will do the opposite, applying gradually more pressure/weight on the outer peg/leg in order to transfer traction and stability to the rear tire. Teaching people to do this on the track always got me amazed stares of enlightenment.

The real challenge is to make it into a natural movement without having to think about it.


Great tip I never gave that all much thought when shifting my weight around I will have to pay more attention to that.
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#4)
Groping is a skill...
 
turkishexpress's Avatar
 
Posts: 14,997
Join Date: May 3, 2008
Location: Chicagoland
March 31, 2011, 02:04 PM

I have also found, which is often not covered on most videos or classes, that I get better stability through long fast corners when I rest most of my weight on the outside knee, on the tank, instead of applying actual pressure to the outside peg. It really stabilizes the bike.


2015 KTM Super Duke 1290 R
2013 Victory Vision Tour
K7 Gixxer 600 - Track Only
RnR Cycles Touched & Tuned


I grope suckaz!!! -
  Facebook Page Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#5)
GP Champ
 
nootherids's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,660
Join Date: January 12, 2011
Location: Woodbridge, VA
March 31, 2011, 02:05 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by n0showjustg0 View Post
Great tip I never gave that all much thought when shifting my weight around I will have to pay more attention to that.
That is a great tip. I've always been conscious on putting the weight on the inside foot when going into the turn but never about putting the weight on the outside foot once you hit that apex and are coming out of the turn. Maybe that might help me cause I'm still afraid of sliding out the back tire coming out of a turn if I give it more gas cause even though you're coming out the bike is still leaned in. If weight on the outer foot gives the rear more traction then that might be the trick.

Now I want to also learn more about trail braking. But I don't think street riding will give be good enough to learn that.
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#6)
GP Champ
 
nootherids's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,660
Join Date: January 12, 2011
Location: Woodbridge, VA
March 31, 2011, 02:09 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by turkishexpress View Post
I have also found, which is often not covered on most videos or classes, that I get better stability through long fast corners when I rest most of my weight on the outside knee, on the tank, instead of applying actual pressure to the outside peg. It really stabilizes the bike.
That's one thing that I have to attribute to my bike. On those long fast sweepers I just drop her down to the right angle and she basically holds steady there all the way through without much additional input. Very well balanced. Or maybe it's the tires, dunno.
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#7)
cake > pie
 
absinthe_now's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,517
Join Date: April 8, 2009
Location: Arlington, Va.
March 31, 2011, 02:18 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leoallafila View Post
As always with MCN they half ass things (and thir video production team sucks, the whole time you can hear the leathers of the guy squeaking... Looks like an amateur video!). The position he explained is generally correct, but you want to add that when moving your body to the right or to the left you need to do so using mainly the leg that lies under you: if you want to lean right, lift your weight to adjust your position with the right leg, and rest any weight that you cannot rest on the seat alone on that same leg as you approach the corner, that will load your front tire giving you more grip as you enter the corner.

At the apex you will do the opposite, applying gradually more pressure/weight on the outer peg/leg in order to transfer traction and stability to the rear tire. Teaching people to do this on the track always got me amazed stares of enlightenment.

The real challenge is to make it into a natural movement without having to think about it.
A bit overwhelming at times but I relate it to learning the perfect golf swing. A whole little check list of things I have to pay attention to till the whole act becomes mostly muscle memory.

Last edited by absinthe_now; March 31, 2011 at 04:58 PM..
  Facebook Page Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#8)
Solid; Jive Turkey...
 
K-DUB's Avatar
 
Posts: 130
Join Date: March 20, 2010
Location: WV
March 31, 2011, 02:27 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by absinthe_now View Post
A bit overwhelming at times but I relate it to learning the perfect golf swing. A whole little check list of things I have to pay attention to till the whole act becomes mostly muscle memory.
Loved that Vid absinthe... pretty much sums up riding a motorcycle, expect the unexpected!!!


Stay Thirsty My Friend...
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#9)
cake > pie
 
absinthe_now's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,517
Join Date: April 8, 2009
Location: Arlington, Va.
March 31, 2011, 04:54 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by K-DUB View Post
Loved that Vid absinthe... pretty much sums up riding a motorcycle, expect the unexpected!!!
The vid in my sig? I like it too. I see it as a motivation for things in my life even beyond 2 wheels. I have strong social anxieties but I know the way to beat them is to challenge myself to conquer them. That video reminds me that it is really only me against myself.
  Facebook Page Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#10)
someone adopt a newb
 
flynmnky's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,297
Join Date: May 12, 2008
Location: Virginia
March 31, 2011, 05:02 PM

Dude...I just watched that video in your sig. Bad....ass. I am digging the editing job too.


Originally Posted by vonstallin
That shit is like wearing a condom your whole life while living in DC, but going to brazil and going bare back with all the chicks because they look better.

derilict:
So next time you feel the need to prove to the world that you should have been euthanized as a child, do it in someone else's thread.

"No such thing as to pretty to ride. The prettier they are the harder you should ride them. This is also true when it comes to woman." Nubbs

Thank you,

Management

2006 SV650: RIP
1982 Yamaha XJ650: Went old school, but moving on
  Send a message via AIM to Send a message via AIM to flynmnky  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#11)
I'm a beginner...
 
Crazi's Avatar
 
Posts: 152
Join Date: January 1, 2005
Location: Da Bridge
March 31, 2011, 05:43 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by nootherids View Post
That is a great tip. I've always been conscious on putting the weight on the inside foot when going into the turn but never about putting the weight on the outside foot once you hit that apex and are coming out of the turn. Maybe that might help me cause I'm still afraid of sliding out the back tire coming out of a turn if I give it more gas cause even though you're coming out the bike is still leaned in. If weight on the outer foot gives the rear more traction then that might be the trick.
The easiest way to learn this type of stuff is on the track. That said, what I used to do during my daily Joplin runs was to practice one thing at a time to see if it worked for me. Some stuff you just won't feel comfortable doing and if its taking thought away from something else you SHOULD be doing, then its best to leave whats not comfortable for a later time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nootherids View Post
Now I want to also learn more about trail braking. But I don't think street riding will give be good enough to learn that.
You can trail brake on the street but not to the same level as you can on a track. I do it all the time...


ALWAYS ride YOUR ride...

2013 White/Black ZX10R -
2004 Blue ZX10R -
2005 Black ZX12R -

"I am not AFRAID of the power, I RESPECT the power..."
  Send a message via AIM to Send a message via Yahoo to Crazi Send a message via AIM to Crazi  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#12)
Your Ad Here
 
Heist's Avatar
 
Posts: 32,564
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: Washington, D.C.
April 7, 2011, 04:18 PM

Arms and shoulders parallel and on the same plane. No twisting your upper body.
Learn to weight the pegs.
Keep your outside knee/thigh welded to the tank.
Keep your chest on the tank, or as low as you can get it. You want to lay on tank.
Keep your upper body rock dead stable during the turn.
When in the turn, learn to drag and modulate your rear brake for fine tuning the arc vs. rolling off the throttle. (Great to practice for low speed, parking lot type turns too).



“Any man who tries to be good all the time is bound to come to ruin among the great number who are not good. Hence a Prince who wants to keep his authority must learn how not to be good, and use that knowledge, or refrain from using it, as necessity requires”.

- Nicolo Machiavelli 1469-1527

  Facebook Page MySpace.com Page Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#13)
AMA Superbike Champ
 
Macon663's Avatar
 
Posts: 756
Join Date: January 10, 2007
Location: Rockville, MD
April 7, 2011, 04:32 PM

One thing to note is a lot of professional riders do exactly the opposite of whats being suggested here. They put the majority of their weight on the outside peg as they start to turn in. Hence the leg dangle you see in motogp and wsbk. And some guys like taylor knapp forget almost entirely about the outside peg until after apex.

something to think about...
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#14)
GP Champ
 
windblown's Avatar
 
Posts: 3,953
Join Date: June 17, 2006
Location: Shenandoah Valley, VA
April 7, 2011, 05:56 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macon663 View Post
One thing to note is a lot of professional riders do exactly the opposite of whats being suggested here. They put the majority of their weight on the outside peg as they start to turn in. Hence the leg dangle you see in motogp and wsbk. And some guys like taylor knapp forget almost entirely about the outside peg until after apex.

something to think about...
Yeah... But what do they know! LOL
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#15)
GP Champ
 
Leoallafila's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,479
Join Date: December 15, 2010
Location: Alexandria, VA
April 7, 2011, 08:28 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macon663 View Post
One thing to note is a lot of professional riders do exactly the opposite of whats being suggested here. They put the majority of their weight on the outside peg as they start to turn in. Hence the leg dangle you see in motogp and wsbk. And some guys like taylor knapp forget almost entirely about the outside peg until after apex.

something to think about...

I disagree: they (Valentino especially) do so only during hard breaking before tight and slow hairpins. Kind of "stop and go" turns where the leg makes you "wider" and harder to pass and is also there and ready in case the bike should slip. You never see them let go of the peg entering a "real" corner, that would mean trouble.


2011 Ducati Diavel Chromo (Current)
2007 BMW R1200GS Adventure (Current)
2006 BMW R1200ST
2003 BMW K1200GT (Current)
2004 Ducati 998s Final Edition (Current)
1997 Aprilia RS250
1998 BMW K1200RS
2000 Ducati 998
1998 Pegaso 650
1999 Ducati 996S
2004 BMW R1150R
2005 Aprilia RSVR Factory
2001 Triumph Tiger 955i
2002 Yamaha FZ1
2006 Buell Ulysses
1991 Suzuki GSX-1100R
1991 Honda Africa Twin 750
2008 Mobster Lefty Trophy pitbike
2004 Aprilia RSVR Factory
1990 Aprilia Pegaso 125
1991 Ducati 888
1995 Honda CR250
1996 Aprilia RS125
1995 Aprilia Sr 50
1984 Kram-it 50
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
vBulletin Skin developed by: vBStyles.com
All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner. The comments are property of their posters, all the rest © 2002-2010 by DCSportbikes.net. DCSportbikes.net is owned by End of Time Studios, LLC.