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Go Back   DCSportbikes.net > Sportbike Operation > Riding Tips

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  (#1)
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gervasio's Avatar
 
Posts: 71
Join Date: August 16, 2004
Location: Silver Spring, MD
July 25, 2005, 04:29 PM

This weekend I was cruising on 495 Eastbound around Georgia Ave. I had to merge over from an unpaved lane to a newly paved lane. The new lanes were like 2 or so inches higher than the lane I was in. I did not know how to handle that. Never been in that siutation before. Is merging onto that new asphalt the same as doing it in a car?

I just rode it out till the pavment evened out. But since I hear so many horror stories of traction issues on bikes (gravel, cold tires, etc), and this being only my 2nd time on the beltway, I'd like to know if I can treat that situation same as a car.

Thanks,

Tim


I'm not psychic. People are just predictable.

Corn. Enjoy it for a second time.
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  (#2)
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Posts: 6,648
Join Date: November 30, 2003
Location: Washington Metropolitan Area
July 25, 2005, 04:42 PM

Smooth and not too slow. Dont slowly go on...Usually, if you stay on your lane, you will bump into the regularly paved part or the old road. The best angle to hit a bump is at 90 degrees but we all know that impossible to do in that situation. Also, sometimes, you will see the lip not as pronounced in certain parts - for example, near a manhole...Usually, they leave asphalt around it so use that as a ramp to get to the new asphalt...Just hints..


“People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.”
-George Orwell


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  (#3)
One and Only
 
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Posts: 6,281
Join Date: June 4, 2004
Location: Cumberland, MD
July 25, 2005, 04:44 PM

Just drop two gears and wheelie that bitch up on it. Don't worry about the ass end kicking around, that's just fun.


Right up the 1 hole.
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  (#4)
Owner & Creator
 
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Posts: 16,418
Join Date: June 11, 2003
Location: TROLL WORLD
July 25, 2005, 05:48 PM

come to a complete stop. back bike up and foward till you get into the new pavement.

I usually just ride it out.
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  (#5)
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Posts: 6,621
Join Date: October 1, 2002
Location: Boston, MA area
July 25, 2005, 06:04 PM

Don't have an answer for you, but I ran into the same situation a couple years ago heading to NY. There was a 3-4 inch difference in road height to my left, jersey walls on my right, lane shift signs everywhere, and HEAVY traffic moving above the speed limit. I was concerned that I might get to a point where my lane disappeared, and I would be forced to make the transition. Not knowing how the bike would have reacted, I kept my eye open for an easy place to do it. Luckily I got to a concrete overpass and was able to transition there, no differential. Bottom line, always keep an eye out for the high road when it starts, and take it, if you can.

Having since jumped the kurb and grass and kurb again at VIR making a pass and survived, I realized that the bike might have made the transition ok, but why chance it.
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  (#6)
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Posts: 6,869
Join Date: September 29, 2002
Location: VA
July 25, 2005, 08:03 PM

Simple. Hit it at about a 30-45 degree angle.

For the less experienced you can move to the opposite side of the lane and then make a normal type of quick lane change and hit it as straight on as you can. Don't forget to turn back straight.

Or just counter steer it really hard from any point to get the angle of attack right.


'08 MARRC Expert Racer of the Year
2009 #3 Combined Overall Championship

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  (#7)
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Join Date: November 30, 2003
Location: Washington Metropolitan Area
July 25, 2005, 11:15 PM

buy an enduro....


“People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.”
-George Orwell


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  (#8)
Riding is like Sex. WEEE!
 
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Posts: 7,034
Join Date: February 1, 2005
July 26, 2005, 06:14 AM

Hit the change as square as possible.

Travis (SvBadguy) said it best.


"Riding a race bike is an art - a thing that you do because you feel something inside."

"I don't like being famous - it is like a prison. And driving for Ferrari would make it far worse."

"I race to win. If I am on the bike or in a car it will always be the same."

"I'm Valentino Rossi. And I want to be a person, not an icon."

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