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  (#1)
I'm a Rookie, How do I Wheelie?
 
SokrTaurus's Avatar
 
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Join Date: June 7, 2003
December 23, 2002, 03:05 PM

Anyone have any tips?


"I've learned that whatever hits the fan will not be evenly distributed."
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  (#2)
Knee Draggin!
 
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December 23, 2002, 03:42 PM

Try rev-matching when you down shift Rev-matching really helps you to make smooth down shifts. My bike has a lot of engine braking and rev-matching helps me downshift without the bike jerking me forward and when I'm riding aggressively it also helps me to prevent the rear wheel from locking up before turning in.

Rev-matching is basically "blipping" the throttle right before you down shift so that the engine speed matches the higher rpm of the gear that you are going down into.

For example, you are cruising along at 6000rpm (25 mph) in 2nd gear. Let's say that to maintain 25mph in 1st gear your engine will be turning at 8000rpm. So to make a smooth transition into 1st gear your engine should be turning at least 8000rpm so that you won't feel that jerky downshift from the sudden change in engine speed.

So when you downshift you pull the clutch in and rev/blip the throttle real quick before you downshift so that the engine speed will match the higher revs of the gear that you are about to downshift into (>8000rpm). Then you make the down shift and let the clutch out slowly.

Try going through the motions just sitting still on the bike for practice and you'll notice the racers doing it on TV.

I hope that this helps, it's sorta hard describing the motions in words,
Chase
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  (#3)
Knee Draggin!
 
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December 23, 2002, 03:44 PM

P.S. I think that rev-matching also helps to extend your clutch life.
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  (#4)
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December 23, 2002, 07:09 PM

That is definitely something I need some practice with. Tifosi you gave me a couple of ideas about what I've been doing wrong. I may be letting the clutch out too quickly, or doing more than just blipping. I definitley need to get this down, because I have had a couple of times when I've gotten squirrely at the track when downshifting and not getting the revs up enough.

I'm also getting TOTW II for x-mas. Is there any discussion of this in there?
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  (#5)
Knee Draggin!
 
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December 23, 2002, 08:39 PM

Quote:
I'm also getting TOTW II for x-mas. Is there any discussion of this in there?
I thumbed through TOTW I, it has a bit about braking and shifting in chapter 8. I'm not sure about TOTW II, I haven't had a chance to read them yet. I should be able to finish them while I'm on vacation...

I bet that riding videos would help a lot.
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Knee Draggin!
 
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December 23, 2002, 09:56 PM

You'll teach me all that stuff too, right Tifosi? As soon as I get my act 2gether on the bike, and stay upright?? 3 more days til Europe


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  (#7)
Knee Draggin!
 
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December 24, 2002, 07:17 AM

Quote:
Blipping the throttle is a great way to downshift. Now I can downshift into a turn without sliding and hearing that back wheel chirp.
This sounds like a great topic for a possible "riding tips" get together Maybe in the spring we can have "riding tips" get togethers so that we can all learn something new from eachother? I think that it would be great for everyone as a warm up session to get back into riding in the spring time. Thoughts?

Chase
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  (#8)
just some dude
 
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December 24, 2002, 07:38 AM

there was an article in motorcycle magazine a few months back that talked about the benefit of NOT blipping the throttle when downshifting. i don't remember specifics of the article but i believe the premise was that NOT blipping the throttle allowed for better control of the bike. :dunno:


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  (#9)
I'm a Rookie, How do I Wheelie?
 
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December 24, 2002, 08:09 AM

Tifosi,

Thanks for all the info. I definitely need to work on my downshifting. And the get together in the Spring is a great idea.


"I've learned that whatever hits the fan will not be evenly distributed."
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  (#10)
Has an idiot exemption
 
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December 24, 2002, 09:40 AM

Kim,
Tifosi is correct with his advice. Another good way to learn downshifting is to ride on the back with someone who does it correctly. That's what I did when I was learning and it really helped me to actually see the procedure...
A get together for practice is a great idea IMO...I know I like to practice emergency braking in the spring after limited riding during the winter.
May I suggest meeting in Daytona for Bike Week?


Steve
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  (#11)
I'm a Rookie, How do I Wheelie?
 
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December 26, 2002, 11:49 AM

Doesn't look like I will be making it to Daytona, but a practice get together would be great.
Especially since, I will be riding the Ninja 500 and haven't spent much time on it.


"I've learned that whatever hits the fan will not be evenly distributed."
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  (#12)
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December 26, 2002, 12:56 PM

Found it! June 2002 issue of Motorcyclist article on blipping...

This article spoke about how difficult it is to correctly and consistently blip the throttle while braking because the brakes are so much more powerful than they used to be when blipping was popular. Instead the author says you should continue to brake as normal and instead of blipping, now as you drop each gear let the clutch out slowly and then go down another gear. He said it's too easy to cause the front to chatter while trying to brake and blip these days. This apparently came from the guys who also race supermotard then carried it back into thier superbike racing.

Besides I'm not sure teaching new riders to blip is a good idea. They should be more focused on corner speed and braking techniques than matching revs. Matching revs is also more of an auditory and tactile skill and I think too many would focus on watching the tach instead of the road. Just my .02

[Edited on 26/12/2002 by speednuts]


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December 26, 2002, 02:03 PM

I'd have to agree w/speednuts. I think its defiately a fine tuning point in your riding.My understanding of corner speed enter/exit is that you want to be using the throttle for most of the speed scrubbing, then the brake, then finally downshifting so you are in the right gear for the exit. So, basically there is much less of a rev matching issue, since at the enterance you are "slow", then rolling on the throttle to "fast". I have a bad habit of using the engine as a brake, but practicing the above mentioned technique really helped me. If we really got our Act together, we could get a track day, & put together some drills from the various schools we've attended..Maybe do it together w/loudon motorsports or something. totw is a great tool, IMO.
just my .02


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  (#14)
Got my Permit
 
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December 27, 2002, 06:40 AM

I would argue that. I think blipping and speedmatching is a huge part of riding, and should be learned. Is it easy, no. But there are more benefits to learning it thatn not.
I could go on for hours over technic, but for the most part its practice. You can practice every time you ride. You don't have to be at redline to practice, it can be at any speed, at any RPM. There are several benefits, one is that not blipping, and letting the clutch out slowly will wear the HELL out of your clutch, its also too time consuming. Its ok for most riding, but at track speeds, it takes too long. Also, by letting the clutch out slowly, uses the engine to bring the back wheel down to speed and vice versa, this causes alot of wear to the engine bearings. Brake pads are alot cheaper than bearings!
Also, more and more people are riding V twins, and they would much rather lock up the rear wheel than rev higher. An inline 4 is more forgiving.
I've been instructing on the track for about 5 years now, and I REALLY think its worth knowing how to downshift propperly.
Adjust your brake lever so its close enough to the bar to hold it firmly in the first knuckle of your middle and ring finger. Thats all you should need. As you blip the throttle, just let you fingers roll out alittle. If the front end bounce from you letting go and then grabbing the brakes, you need alittle more practice.
Hope this helps, just my .02............


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  (#15)
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December 27, 2002, 08:37 AM

Any time you down shift without the intention of a complete stop you should be matching revs between gears. If I'm making a complete stop or slowing to a crawl(going all the way to first,maybe second) I'll click down a couple gears at once and ease out the clutch a bit around 10-15mph just to make sure the gears change and give a little engine braking, but even then the revs are close to matching.

On the other hand, if I'm riding aggressively or on the track I drop one gear at a time and match revs by blipping. It is smoother and it keeps the engine in the powerband. There are some instances on the track when I will drop multiple gears at once, I do that entering turn 5 at Summit. On the track and occasionally on the street, depending on my mood and if everything is going well, sometimes I'll drop two or three gears and drop the clutch. Because I'm braking hard and most of the weight is on my front tire, the rear gets light and will lock or hop which allows me to "back it in" somewhat. You must be very careful doing that otherwise you can highside. My Interceptor 500 has a tendency to lock up by just chopping the throttle in some circumstances. Sometimes it's annoying, other times it can be fun.


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