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2blueyam, GRN96WS6
Most users ever online was 4,519, September 2, 2015 at 03:26 AM.
Go Back   DCSportbikes.net > Sportbike Operation > Riding Tips

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  (#1)
GP Racer
 
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Join Date: January 16, 2003
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June 9, 2004, 05:21 PM

Got a chance to try this out at the track recently, and it works awsome.

Basically the idea is when you are braking hard ( at racetrack speeds ), scoot your ass backwards in the seat as far as possible to get more weight to the back of the bike. I found a good time to do this is as you are coming out of your tuck.

It makes the bike significantly more stable under hard braking, really reduces the tail wag you get when the rear wheel is getting light.

They had 5 brake markers set up and I found I could brake a full marker later and still get the bike stopped in time by using this approach.

Aaron mentioned the idea to me from a book he read, cant remember the name. But I noticed the fast guys at the Formula USA races ( Barnes, Himmelsbach ) were clearly doing this going into T1, where as guys in the back of the pack wernt so much, and their bikes showed it.

If your seat is highly angled, you may need to grip the tank with your knees in order to prevent sliding forward once you get on the brakes hard.
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  (#2)
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June 9, 2004, 05:26 PM

word Doug. got summit main coming up on Monday, I'll definitely try this out. Im still working on braking while downshifting so hopefully towards the end of the day I can try and work on this. T1 is definitely where I'll be trying this.

word


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  (#3)
Richard Cranium
 
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Join Date: October 17, 2003
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June 9, 2004, 06:43 PM

ive been doing this anytime Ive had to "emergency" break on the street.....I had one instance where someone cut me off...then stopped on rt1 for no good reason..just for thrills I guess...well anyways...squeesed the front break a little too fast and ended up bringing the rear tire off the ground.......have had a couple of quick stop pratice sessions in a parking lot and have tried sitting back more...I can honestly say your correct..works for me too!!


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  (#4)
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June 9, 2004, 08:01 PM

It's a good tip Doug. On my GSXR, it was a MUST-do, not just a do-do. Still, that thing would heave its rear-end and make noise as the chaingear slapped around on downshifting. It became part of the fun though. God I miss that bike (moment of silent self-pity).

Anyway, I wanted to add that while skootching back in the seat is a prerequisite of fast-slowing, it's easy lock-out your arms if your not thinking about it. Remember, your arms are a very integral part of the suspension under hard braking, just as your legs are when you're launching out of a corner. So don't let your arms become a pair of 2x4's. Bend at the elbow, so you can soak-up the bumps. You'll brake even later, and slow, uh... even faster!


Johnny V.
CCS & ASRA #67

2006 Suzuki GSX-R1000
2004 Suzuki GSX-R600 (racing)
2004 Aprilia 1000 Mille R (street)
2001 Aprilia 1000 Falco (street)
2001 Suzuki GSX-R600 (racing)
1995 Kawasaki ZX-6E (street and racing)
1986 Yamaha Radian 600
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  (#5)
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June 9, 2004, 08:37 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by JPVaccaro
On my GSXR, it was a MUST-do, not just a do-do. Still, that thing would heave its rear-end and make noise as the chaingear slapped around on downshifting.
You could have eliminated that with proper suspension set-up.
Or you can just stay mid-pack and ride it like it is.


Steve
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  (#6)
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June 9, 2004, 10:44 PM

Probably just a joke that went over my head, but how would suspension set up keep you from lifting the rear? And if it did, wouldn't you just break harder, later, and lift it then?
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  (#7)
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June 9, 2004, 11:58 PM

Dave, I didn't say it before, but tacetly, I agree with Steve. More compression or preload in the front (and perhaps less rebound in the back) would keep the rearend down more under hard braking.

Steve's comments were a reference to how I had told him all about my bike's handling issues, but I never really did anything about it (just like the fuel injection issue). Pat (new owner) let me ride it at Summit, on street tires. Whatever he did to it, the bike actually handled better than when I owned it. Without really pushing it, I was going as fast as I did last year during races on GP rubber. That really made me miss the bike!

When I get back to racing, I'll be spending a lot more time, effort, and money on getting my bike to handle well for me. When I bought the gsxr, all I did was have the forks rebuilt (Traxxion Dynamics), and a Penske shock installed (and ride height raised). I never fine-tuned it, partly because I didn't know any better, and partly because it handled so much better than my old racebike (95 ZX6-E). But I got faster (as everyone did) and it stopped working as well the last few years in the expert class.

As I told Steve (at one TWT parking lot chat last winter), I got sick of running not-so-well, or even toward the back at times when the FI problem was severe. So, I'm gonna get back to racing more seriously when I can devote more to it. For me, there's no point in risking so much unless you're doing very well, or at least improving. So, I've stopped racing... for now.


Johnny V.
CCS & ASRA #67

2006 Suzuki GSX-R1000
2004 Suzuki GSX-R600 (racing)
2004 Aprilia 1000 Mille R (street)
2001 Aprilia 1000 Falco (street)
2001 Suzuki GSX-R600 (racing)
1995 Kawasaki ZX-6E (street and racing)
1986 Yamaha Radian 600
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  (#8)
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June 10, 2004, 07:22 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by JPVaccaro
As I told Steve (at one TWT parking lot chat last winter), I got sick of running not-so-well, or even toward the back at times when the FI problem was severe. So, I'm gonna get back to racing more seriously when I can devote more to it. For me, there's no point in risking so much unless you're doing very well, or at least improving. So, I've stopped racing... for now.
You da man JP!
I know you will kick some ass when you get back on the track.
You have the perfect attitude!


Steve
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  (#9)
Mr. Glass
 
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June 10, 2004, 09:55 AM

gracias on the tip.. this something that shoulda come to me as common sense.. but it didnt.. so thanks for makin me aware


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  (#10)
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June 10, 2004, 01:37 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveZX9
You da man JP!
I know you will kick some ass when you get back on the track.
You have the perfect attitude!
You think my ass looks fat in my leathers.
I cry myself to sleep when I think of that.
Is it true, Steve?
You have to understand that adult diapers are not very slimming.
That's the REAL reason I'm not racing this year.


Johnny V.
CCS & ASRA #67

2006 Suzuki GSX-R1000
2004 Suzuki GSX-R600 (racing)
2004 Aprilia 1000 Mille R (street)
2001 Aprilia 1000 Falco (street)
2001 Suzuki GSX-R600 (racing)
1995 Kawasaki ZX-6E (street and racing)
1986 Yamaha Radian 600
(street)
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  (#11)
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June 10, 2004, 02:55 PM

good tip, i've heard that from sportbike2 also. its helped me on emergency braking on the streets.
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  (#12)
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June 10, 2004, 07:15 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by JPVaccaro
You have to understand that adult diapers are not very slimming.
Like I would know anything about slimming.
You are still my hero...diapers or not.
I don't care if you steal phone numbers or not!


Steve
2015 Yamaha R1
2011 Harley Electra Glide Limited
2009 Yamaha Zuma 125
2006 Honda CRF150F
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  (#13)
Knee Draggin!
 
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August 27, 2004, 08:00 AM

Anybody have any tips for downshifting while braking hard
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  (#14)
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August 27, 2004, 08:31 AM

This tip is the bomb! I tried it this morning and a while back when I read this post. As for downshifting...hopefully the track/experienced guys can help you with that.
-Chris


Chris
2008 MARRC AM Racer of the Year
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  (#15)
Knee Draggin!
 
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August 27, 2004, 09:55 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by deviousR6
As for downshifting...hopefully the track/experienced guys can help you with that.
-Chris
Yeah, like one gear at a time while using the clutch or 2 or 3 gears at a time and releasing the clutch at the end of the multiple gear changes
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