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  (#1)
I'm a Rookie, How do I Wheelie?
 
Posts: 21
Join Date: March 9, 2004
March 19, 2004, 09:13 AM

So what are some things you guys would recommend for learning how to modulate the throttle? I keep finding myself overreving accidentally when trying to roll into first gear.
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  (#2)
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Join Date: October 15, 2003
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March 19, 2004, 09:23 AM

practice practice practice. I don't know how safe it is to trust some peice of technology to teach you.

I guess it could be like training wheels.

How much are you over reving??


'00 Kawasaki Ninja ZX6-R
'03 Honda XR100R
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  (#3)
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March 19, 2004, 09:35 AM

what is the world coming to when i'm agreeing with tj again.

he's right - there i said it. wow that was painful.

practice is the only way that you'll get the feel of your throttle. maybe go to a parking lot or a side street where you can try taking off slow without having to worry about traffic.
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  (#4)
I'm a Rookie, How do I Wheelie?
 
Posts: 21
Join Date: March 9, 2004
March 19, 2004, 10:05 AM

Yeah, I've been practicing in font of my house. No cars parked on the side, and it's a big straight away.

I'll start out steady at like 2 grand (too much?), and find myself getting up to 4 grand and having to let off constantly. I figured practice would help.

What are you guys revving to to get rolling in first?
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  (#5)
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March 19, 2004, 10:15 AM

I let the clutch out first. Revs are usually enough to make the bike move just by doing that.

Then when you want to go faster, THEN you start giving it gas.

Mandy:


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'03 Honda XR100R
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  (#6)
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Location: Sterling, VA
March 19, 2004, 10:21 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThrustinJZX6
I let the clutch out first. Revs are usually enough to make the bike move just by doing that.

Then when you want to go faster, THEN you start giving it gas.

Mandy:
Exactly what I do too. Practice is the only way you will get the "feel" for it.
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  (#7)
I'm a Rookie, How do I Wheelie?
 
Posts: 21
Join Date: March 9, 2004
March 19, 2004, 10:26 AM

Good deal, I never thought of letting the clutch out first. I'll work on that today. I'm hoping to not have to think about it eventually, just like driving my manual car.
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  (#8)
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March 19, 2004, 10:33 AM

Making sure your chain and clutch are properly adjusted is paramount to smooth launches.
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  (#9)
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March 19, 2004, 04:47 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Twiggy6
Making sure your chain and clutch are properly adjusted is paramount to smooth launches.
I cant tell you how much your chain being in spec makes changing gears that much better. Mine was off by 1/2" spec is between .8 and 1.2, mine was at 1.75" Shifting is so smooth now, and took about 5 mins to do.

Other than that let the clutch out first, you will feel the bike start to move and then you gotta practice on finding the right point on the gas and clutch. Make sure your throttle play is in spec too. Keep practicing, it will become natural after a while.


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  (#10)
I'm a Rookie, How do I Wheelie?
 
Posts: 21
Join Date: March 9, 2004
March 22, 2004, 01:38 PM

Just wanted to say thanks fellas. I was able to get moving in a straight line without even touching my throttle. Because of that I was able to practice shifting up and down, and doing slow turns.

It is getting easier with more practice. I guess the 1,000 stop signs in my neighborhood are actually good for something.
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  (#11)
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March 22, 2004, 01:59 PM

Great!! Soon you will be doing it without thinking about it.
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  (#12)
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March 23, 2004, 03:36 PM

Wait, first gear, throttle modulation, clutch, shifting, circles...thought you were talking about wheelies at first. Another thing that contributes to choppy/ham fisted throttle inputs is your grip on the throttle. Relax it. Make sure you're not holding onto it white-knuckled tight and loosen up your wrist/arm.
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  (#13)
Knee Draggin!
 
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Location: Manassas
March 26, 2004, 12:22 PM

Let out the clutch till you feel it start to engage, then just give it a tiny turn of the throttle. Much like other people have already said. Treat it the same way you would a car.

One habit I've gotten into for some unknown reason is to slightly blip the throttle, then let out the clutch as the revs drop. I usually always manage to let the clutch out right when the revs hot the right spot. It's easier for me than running the revs up while letting the clutch out. I used to stall a lot doing that which is why I started blipping I guess. I don't know how clear I'm being.

Something this thread reminded me of is that it seems that people who know how to drive a stick have a much easier time learning to ride a bike. I guess because you already understand the concept of shifting, and "launching". My sister had a helluva time when she first started because she didn't know how to drive stick, and clutches and shifting was foreign to her.

-Mod
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  (#14)
I'm a Rookie, How do I Wheelie?
 
Posts: 21
Join Date: March 9, 2004
March 26, 2004, 12:40 PM

Yeah the person who's teaching me right now said the same thing. He tried teaching someone who drove an automatic all their life and it was horrible.
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  (#15)
Got my Permit
 
Posts: 59
Join Date: March 2, 2004
March 28, 2004, 07:56 AM

The MSF course teaches finding the friction point. just stand with the clutch all the way in and slowly release. the friction point is where the bike starts pulling. pull the clutch back in and repeat. let it out too soon (and all the way)and you'll stall. if u just practice finding the friction point quickly by letting out the clutch gently yet accurately you'll become more comfy, and quicker at it. from there it's just a matter of managing the clutch to keep the revs constant as the bike catches up to the engine. use the clutch to slow the engine, and the throttle to keep the revs from stalling. two sides of the same coin. in an emergency you want to be able to get past that clutch dead space and to the friction point so you can start hauling ass away from that SUV that didn't see u at the stop sign.

also, provided your throttle play is in proper shape...practice getting to and holding 2000rpms....in neutral, with the clutch in. get good at it....then do it with 4,000 rpms. from idle. it only takes a millimeter of throttle turn to get there. that'll give you an idea of the finesse it'll take.

hope this helps.

googs
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