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Go Back   DCSportbikes.net > Sportbike Operation > Riding Tips

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  (#1)
You meet the nicest
 
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Join Date: June 3, 2003
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September 14, 2005, 03:16 PM

Posting here because another thread got locked

-yz- [wrote]
Here I am, fresh out of MSF, 3 months of everyday riding under my belt, thinking that the back brake will high side me over a traffic light I strictly use the rear for slow speed stuff, is that bad


The rear brake won’t high side you over a stop light because you’re typically straight up and down there. IF you’ve locked up the rear brake and the back tire is sliding, the bike may fishtail some due to misalignment or uneven pressure on the bars. If that happens then leave it locked until stopped OR you’ve got the bike “body englished” back into alignment.

In the basic MSF class students are coached to leave it locked until stopped. That’s for range safety due to many students having NO prior riding experience. With a little seat time under your belt, by all means try the wet (or dry) parking lot drill. 60 mph is quite unnecessary. 30-40 is plenty fast to get the feel of the technique.

The big danger of the rear brake is having it be a rider’s “go to” control input when they find themselves getting into a corner too hot or find a nasty surprise around the bend. We’re talking about the BIG SCARE here, where survival instinct kicks in. If that instinct is to step hard on the rear brake (with the bike leaned over) then bye bye. . .


BECAUSE I GET OFF ON IT!
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Typical Stripper
 
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September 14, 2005, 03:22 PM

You tha man Jim!


Nate CCS/ASRA #29 - www.nudebikesracing.com - 2012 MARRC AM Racer of the Year

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One and Only
 
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September 14, 2005, 03:28 PM

Thanks Jim! You're right about the drill. 60 is more just for fun. lol

I'm such a squid.


Right up the 1 hole.
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  (#4)
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September 14, 2005, 03:35 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nudist
You tha man Jim!
Thanks Nate, I want to address that backing it in topic but haven't had time yet.


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I'm a Rookie, How do I Wheelie?
 
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Join Date: November 30, 2005
Location: Woodbridge, VA
December 6, 2005, 09:12 AM

Good points - excellent, in fact. Not that I am by any means a superior rider, but I've got 20+ years in the saddle and a few at tracks.

Here's my rear braking:

1. I avoid it, as practice, because as you put it very well I do not wish to reinforce the "go-to" control in an emergency.
2. I'll apply it at low speeds and where the bike is more upright or near vertical.
3. And/or I play with it for practice; skidding, emerency slides, backing the rear in...


But, 95% of my braking is front, butt backed on the saddle for hard braking.


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  (#6)
B
It goes to 11.
 
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December 6, 2005, 09:19 AM

There's a rear brake?


I only use it to F around...


SV650s for SALE!!!
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I'm a Rookie, How do I Wheelie?
 
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December 6, 2005, 09:37 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by gixrben
There's a rear brake?


I only use it to F around...
I like that answer as well...good summation
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Got my Permit
 
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February 23, 2006, 11:32 PM

As a matter of practise, I never use my rear brake. Yes, it does reduce stopping distance when coming to a complete stop, but it also consumes a lot of your attention to do so. So it's a trade-off. You make the call.

At either rate, you should know how to deal with rear wheel skid under braking should you accidentally do it. It's tricky but you can get out of the skid by using body english. I'm not too good with it, but as a matter of practise I've trained myself not to rely on the rear brake so it's not a problem for me.

Just remember that using the rear brake is the opposite of the front. As you increase braking, weight transfers to the front and you can apply more front brakes; however, weight transfers off of the rear so you are more likely to lock the rear wheel (less weight on a tyre = easier to lock up brakes). So if you want to modulate the rear at impending lockup, you have to ease off pedal pressure as weight comes off of the rear. Very tricky to do under hard braking as most, probably as much as 75%, of the weight is on the front wheel.

So do what you want, as long as you know what you're getting into. It's not a big deal really. Just takes some practise to grind it into your head what to do.
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Dressed for Success
 
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February 23, 2006, 11:38 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by g6civcx
As a matter of practise, I never use my rear brake. Yes, it does reduce stopping distance when coming to a complete stop, but it also consumes a lot of your attention to do so. So it's a trade-off. You make the call.
It only consumes your attention until it becomes second nature. Pratice makes perfect, and having both brakes helps.
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February 24, 2006, 12:28 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninja636
It only consumes your attention until it becomes second nature. Pratice makes perfect, and having both brakes helps.
True. You can practise it enough to the point where it won't consume so much of your attention, and having both brakes do help reduce braking distance, but I worry more about control because ultimately that will affect you more than anything else.

There is a balance between those two things and how far you push it is a matter of personal preference. But no matter how good you are, using the rear brake is a fine art and you need to know the intricacies about it.

It's a matter of preference and I choose not to use it for most cases. I do use it sometimes when appropriate, but I do always have to keep in mind the weight transfer and braking pressure.
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