DCSportbikes.net  
» Help Support .NET!
DCSportbikes Premier Membership for 25$ per year. Discounts! Click here for full information.

Now available in the .NET Shop:



Get your DCSBN Gear!
» Shoutbox
Sorry, only registered users have the ability to use our real-time shoutbox to chat with other members.

Register now, it's free!
» Online Users: 528
3 members and 525 guests
2blueyam, CCS762ZX6, tonetone
Most users ever online was 4,519, September 2, 2015 at 03:26 AM.
Go Back   DCSportbikes.net > Brand Specific > Ducati

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools
Multistrada - what should I know?
Unread
  (#1)
Slowest Going Straight
 
SailorJack's Avatar
 
Posts: 229
Join Date: April 6, 2014
Location: Saint Leonard
Multistrada - what should I know? - October 21, 2017, 06:07 AM

So in the next few months I'll be adding another bike to the garage. It must be able to pull 600 mile days with ease and comfort, 2 up riding half the time, at least a big top box, and commute to work occasionally. I currently have a vstrom and a vfr. The vstrom will be replaced and I like the tall seat height and upright riding style.

The 2010 and newer Multistrada is at the top of my list followed by the FJ09, newer vstrom, Versys 1000, and others.

I'd be looking more at used Multistradas but are the horror stories I read online enough to make me run away? I'll be honest, I've had a lot of good bikes but I really want a bike that makes me want to look at it as much as I want to ride it. I've never owned a Ducati but I think I want to taste the Koolaide.

Anyone have an opinion on the bike? Should I jump in or run away?

Recommended dealers in the DC area? I see Coleman PWS are the big ones.


MSF Rider Coach 166210

Last edited by SailorJack; October 21, 2017 at 06:49 AM..
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#2)
On vacation
 
RileysDad's Avatar
 
Posts: 5,976
Join Date: June 17, 2008
Location: Rockville, MD
October 21, 2017, 09:00 AM

Hey Jack - PM coolkhas, I believe he did one of his Italy tours on a Multi.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitz View Post
My wife wants to get LASIK or a boob job

She asked my opinion

I told her I have no vested interest in making her eyesight better
Quote:
Originally Posted by alex View Post
Im not really fast enough to notice a difference between tires. I buy the kind thats black and made out of rubber.
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#3)
GP Champ
 
Leoallafila's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,479
Join Date: December 15, 2010
Location: Alexandria, VA
October 21, 2017, 10:25 AM

Modern Ducati's have very good reliability, on par with German bikes, just behind SOME Japanese bikes. Go for it, if you don't like it, resale value is great. Duc Pond is the tits for Ducatis in the NOVA area but they are in Fredricksburgtonville so not exactly behind the corner. Battley's has done good work for me too.


2011 Ducati Diavel Chromo (Current)
2007 BMW R1200GS Adventure (Current)
2006 BMW R1200ST
2003 BMW K1200GT (Current)
2004 Ducati 998s Final Edition (Current)
1997 Aprilia RS250
1998 BMW K1200RS
2000 Ducati 998
1998 Pegaso 650
1999 Ducati 996S
2004 BMW R1150R
2005 Aprilia RSVR Factory
2001 Triumph Tiger 955i
2002 Yamaha FZ1
2006 Buell Ulysses
1991 Suzuki GSX-1100R
1991 Honda Africa Twin 750
2008 Mobster Lefty Trophy pitbike
2004 Aprilia RSVR Factory
1990 Aprilia Pegaso 125
1991 Ducati 888
1995 Honda CR250
1996 Aprilia RS125
1995 Aprilia Sr 50
1984 Kram-it 50
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#4)
GP Champ
 
Leoallafila's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,479
Join Date: December 15, 2010
Location: Alexandria, VA
October 21, 2017, 10:30 AM

Here is some hard data: https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/...tion/index.htm


2011 Ducati Diavel Chromo (Current)
2007 BMW R1200GS Adventure (Current)
2006 BMW R1200ST
2003 BMW K1200GT (Current)
2004 Ducati 998s Final Edition (Current)
1997 Aprilia RS250
1998 BMW K1200RS
2000 Ducati 998
1998 Pegaso 650
1999 Ducati 996S
2004 BMW R1150R
2005 Aprilia RSVR Factory
2001 Triumph Tiger 955i
2002 Yamaha FZ1
2006 Buell Ulysses
1991 Suzuki GSX-1100R
1991 Honda Africa Twin 750
2008 Mobster Lefty Trophy pitbike
2004 Aprilia RSVR Factory
1990 Aprilia Pegaso 125
1991 Ducati 888
1995 Honda CR250
1996 Aprilia RS125
1995 Aprilia Sr 50
1984 Kram-it 50
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#5)
GP Champ
 
windblown's Avatar
 
Posts: 3,953
Join Date: June 17, 2006
Location: Shenandoah Valley, VA
October 21, 2017, 02:58 PM

I'd warn you away from them but hell I've had four KTMs so who am I to talk?

+1 on Duc Pond in Winchester if you take the plunge.


There's bold riders and old riders, but damn few bold old riders.
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#6)
Your Ad Here
 
Heist's Avatar
 
Posts: 32,586
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: Washington, D.C.
October 21, 2017, 04:43 PM

Probably talk to Turk. If I'm not mistaken he had a Multistrada at one point.



“Any man who tries to be good all the time is bound to come to ruin among the great number who are not good. Hence a Prince who wants to keep his authority must learn how not to be good, and use that knowledge, or refrain from using it, as necessity requires”.

- Nicolo Machiavelli 1469-1527

  Facebook Page MySpace.com Page Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#7)
GP Champ
 
Leoallafila's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,479
Join Date: December 15, 2010
Location: Alexandria, VA
October 22, 2017, 01:36 AM

I'd also add that said data is a little skewed: comparing which bikes have issues solely based on the timeframe doesn't paint the full picture: a touring bike from BMW gets a WHOLE lot more use than the average Japanese sportbike, or the average Harley rider. At the same time it's not fair to compare high end exotic sportbikes that get ridden hard to a Harley that gets pampered and rides around doing 2000 rpms. Based on my experience which is a mix of riding in EU and the US I'd say that most manufacturers are closer to each other than these results show, with the Jap bikes being typically the easiest to live with.

If you tour Europe most other bikes that are touring will be BMW's and that is spreading to the US too. They simply take mileage and age in a different way (also when it comes to styling) compared to a Japanese bike.

Ducati is it's own thing, can't really compare their total production numbers to the other players but they have a definite edge on the design and riding aspects, and are often on top or at least on par on the game as far as technology goes. I'd had many Ducs, loved them all, and I did over 20k of track days on a heavily tuned 851 that was built in the darkest days of Ducati quality control. It did bend 2 valves on the track once but that was due to me stretching the maintenance intervals because of money constraints. It's still one of my all time favorite bikes I've had.

Now a modern Multistrada is no 851, it's quantum leaps better built and when it boils down to ONE single bike, statistics will only be a vague indication: some people will have blessed bikes that they abuse, some people will have nightmares that will make them hate the brand, but on average you'll be ok either way.


2011 Ducati Diavel Chromo (Current)
2007 BMW R1200GS Adventure (Current)
2006 BMW R1200ST
2003 BMW K1200GT (Current)
2004 Ducati 998s Final Edition (Current)
1997 Aprilia RS250
1998 BMW K1200RS
2000 Ducati 998
1998 Pegaso 650
1999 Ducati 996S
2004 BMW R1150R
2005 Aprilia RSVR Factory
2001 Triumph Tiger 955i
2002 Yamaha FZ1
2006 Buell Ulysses
1991 Suzuki GSX-1100R
1991 Honda Africa Twin 750
2008 Mobster Lefty Trophy pitbike
2004 Aprilia RSVR Factory
1990 Aprilia Pegaso 125
1991 Ducati 888
1995 Honda CR250
1996 Aprilia RS125
1995 Aprilia Sr 50
1984 Kram-it 50
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#8)
Triumph-ant
 
Sal_the_man's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,164
Join Date: November 6, 2015
Location: Middletown, MD
October 22, 2017, 11:12 AM

https://washingtondc.craigslist.org/...352833590.html


1996 GS500E - Sold
2001 Speed Triple 955i - Sold
1999 Daytona 955i - Sold
2000 Ducati 748S
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#9)
Aqua Velvet
 
Posts: 435
Join Date: May 22, 2013
Location: Gorgeous Prince George's
October 22, 2017, 05:20 PM

Go to Faster Twin in the DMV area if you want the best service available for the Duc. He's fixed several DucPond f*ck ups and to my knowledge is the only guy in the Mid Atlantic certified by the factory direct to work on everything they make to include the D16.

https://www.fastertwin.com
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#10)
GP Racer
 
coolkhas's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,157
Join Date: March 31, 2011
Location: coolkhas@gmail.com
October 23, 2017, 08:13 AM

Alright, I'll chime in.

I guess it depends on what you're really looking for. I HATED the Multi. I had such high expectations of the bike, but man was I disappointed.

The bike does GREAT, for long high way runs. I was on highways for over 8 hours one of the days I was riding it, and it honestly handled it like a beast. No cramping, plenty if power, smooth in the gears.

BUT, most of my trip d idnt consist if highways. We were up in the random mountains if Italy. Right roads, switchbacks, elevation changes, just all sorts if twists and turns. This is where I started hating this bike. The clutch wasn't smooth, the throttle always had a slight delay, the bike is too big and bulky to really be able to flick around. Just d idnt do well.

I've ridden other Ducatis, and owned them also. I'll say it's a hit or miss with them. I had an older Ducati Monster that gave me nothing but problems. I now have a newer Monster and no issues in that.

Idk, the multi seems like a great bike on paper, but it just didn't do it for me...
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#11)
GP Champ
 
Leoallafila's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,479
Join Date: December 15, 2010
Location: Alexandria, VA
October 23, 2017, 02:15 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by coolkhas View Post
Alright, I'll chime in.

I guess it depends on what you're really looking for. I HATED the Multi. I had such high expectations of the bike, but man was I disappointed.

The bike does GREAT, for long high way runs. I was on highways for over 8 hours one of the days I was riding it, and it honestly handled it like a beast. No cramping, plenty if power, smooth in the gears.

BUT, most of my trip d idnt consist if highways. We were up in the random mountains if Italy. Right roads, switchbacks, elevation changes, just all sorts if twists and turns. This is where I started hating this bike. The clutch wasn't smooth, the throttle always had a slight delay, the bike is too big and bulky to really be able to flick around. Just d idnt do well.

I've ridden other Ducatis, and owned them also. I'll say it's a hit or miss with them. I had an older Ducati Monster that gave me nothing but problems. I now have a newer Monster and no issues in that.

Idk, the multi seems like a great bike on paper, but it just didn't do it for me...
how (not) tall are you?


2011 Ducati Diavel Chromo (Current)
2007 BMW R1200GS Adventure (Current)
2006 BMW R1200ST
2003 BMW K1200GT (Current)
2004 Ducati 998s Final Edition (Current)
1997 Aprilia RS250
1998 BMW K1200RS
2000 Ducati 998
1998 Pegaso 650
1999 Ducati 996S
2004 BMW R1150R
2005 Aprilia RSVR Factory
2001 Triumph Tiger 955i
2002 Yamaha FZ1
2006 Buell Ulysses
1991 Suzuki GSX-1100R
1991 Honda Africa Twin 750
2008 Mobster Lefty Trophy pitbike
2004 Aprilia RSVR Factory
1990 Aprilia Pegaso 125
1991 Ducati 888
1995 Honda CR250
1996 Aprilia RS125
1995 Aprilia Sr 50
1984 Kram-it 50
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#12)
Slowest Going Straight
 
SailorJack's Avatar
 
Posts: 229
Join Date: April 6, 2014
Location: Saint Leonard
October 23, 2017, 06:51 PM

Thanks for all the replies. Lots of great info. I'm pretty sure this will be my next bike. I'll just jump right in and hope for the best. I've owned over 20 bikes and never a Harley, BMW or Ducati. Life is to short to not try all the flavors.

Saying that, keep the encouragement coming!


MSF Rider Coach 166210
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#13)
Groping is a skill...
 
turkishexpress's Avatar
 
Posts: 14,997
Join Date: May 3, 2008
Location: Chicagoland
October 23, 2017, 09:09 PM

I had a 2011 S Touring and never had an issue outside of a few known ones that were taken care of by warranty like the ecu that controls the electronic suspension. I thought it was a great bike. Handled well. Had plenty of power for a bike of it's kind. Sounded good. Kept it for about 4 years and got the KTM since I wasn't really doing much touring on it. Definitely go on ducati.ms and pick their brains there. They'll be able to tell you which generation will deliver the goods for what you're looking for. I honestly love the look of the newest generation but have heard horrible stories about the engine in terms of its power delivery and there seems to be very few viable tuning options.

The one thing that always bothered me on all newer generation of MTSs (including mine) was the low RPM rideability. Even with a custom flash tune they couldn't fully smooth it out. If you keep it above 3.5K you're good. KTM does a much better job of this. Just an FYI.


2015 KTM Super Duke 1290 R
2013 Victory Vision Tour
K7 Gixxer 600 - Track Only
RnR Cycles Touched & Tuned


I grope suckaz!!! -
  Facebook Page Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#14)
GP Champ
 
Leoallafila's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,479
Join Date: December 15, 2010
Location: Alexandria, VA
October 24, 2017, 01:58 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by turkishexpress View Post
I had a 2011 S Touring and never had an issue outside of a few known ones that were taken care of by warranty like the ecu that controls the electronic suspension. I thought it was a great bike. Handled well. Had plenty of power for a bike of it's kind. Sounded good. Kept it for about 4 years and got the KTM since I wasn't really doing much touring on it. Definitely go on ducati.ms and pick their brains there. They'll be able to tell you which generation will deliver the goods for what you're looking for. I honestly love the look of the newest generation but have heard horrible stories about the engine in terms of its power delivery and there seems to be very few viable tuning options.

The one thing that always bothered me on all newer generation of MTSs (including mine) was the low RPM rideability. Even with a custom flash tune they couldn't fully smooth it out. If you keep it above 3.5K you're good. KTM does a much better job of this. Just an FYI.
That's a trade off: you can't have a big twin be smooth at low rpms AND have a lot of power at high rpms


2011 Ducati Diavel Chromo (Current)
2007 BMW R1200GS Adventure (Current)
2006 BMW R1200ST
2003 BMW K1200GT (Current)
2004 Ducati 998s Final Edition (Current)
1997 Aprilia RS250
1998 BMW K1200RS
2000 Ducati 998
1998 Pegaso 650
1999 Ducati 996S
2004 BMW R1150R
2005 Aprilia RSVR Factory
2001 Triumph Tiger 955i
2002 Yamaha FZ1
2006 Buell Ulysses
1991 Suzuki GSX-1100R
1991 Honda Africa Twin 750
2008 Mobster Lefty Trophy pitbike
2004 Aprilia RSVR Factory
1990 Aprilia Pegaso 125
1991 Ducati 888
1995 Honda CR250
1996 Aprilia RS125
1995 Aprilia Sr 50
1984 Kram-it 50
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#15)
I'm a llama again!
 
Slider's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,314
Join Date: April 12, 2007
Location: Alexandria
October 24, 2017, 11:42 AM

I also had one loaded, full Term exhaust and DP chip, all the bags. It was a 2010 I had it 4 like four years.

IF you are trying to compare it to a GS1200 it's not a good comparison. Everything the GS does really well the Multi does a pore job of it and everything the Multi extremely well the GS is okay. Not knocking the GS in anyway but the GS is a true adventure bike in every sense of how it is built and it's hard to argue that it not the best adventure bike made.

The Multi really is not a good off road machine the rear brake fails all the time because it's to close to the exhaust and has always been weak. On the road no big deal because the front brakes are really good, better then your average sport bike but you pay the price for that.

The suspension I found takes awhile to get just right with all the mods the bike has. But when you do the bike is super nimble in traffic and getting around in tight areas. Stand on the pegs with really slow speed blip the throttle she will perk up, no one needs a bike that heavy rolling over for a belly rub.

Things that were and issue, rear brake, and the gas tank will swell because of the ethanol. Oh and watch the thumb screws for lowering and rising the wind screen I lost one because I didn't tighten it enough.

Now the good parts, the thing is hella fun!! It has tons of power, and handles on the street amazingly. In the mountains you could keep up with any sport bike.

I drag raced a Z1000 against a guy that is a drag racer and smoked that his z1000.

It was great for all day trips, even road it down to Alabama/TN boarder to my parents farm.

Only thing on my wish list for that bike was shaft drive. For a bike designed to put tons of miles on it chain maintenance was a pain.

Also if you get the bike I have a really nice machined aluminum rear axle nut tool I will sell you. Even has the torque specs machine etched on the side.

Oh and last thing if your feeling frisky and you want to wheelie the bike down rout 50 with your wife on the back. Not a problem Well in till you stop and she cusses you out. Just saying.


Yeah I am old enough to know better. Thing is, I just don't care.

Last edited by Slider; October 24, 2017 at 04:48 PM..
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
vBulletin Skin developed by: vBStyles.com
All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner. The comments are property of their posters, all the rest © 2002-2010 by DCSportbikes.net. DCSportbikes.net is owned by End of Time Studios, LLC.