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CrazyMotorcycleGuy
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  (#1)
opossum puncher
 
zx6rfool's Avatar
 
Posts: 7,825
Join Date: June 9, 2003
Location: Winchester
January 3, 2006, 11:41 AM

Hi all, I have a friend with a SV, he bought it to tide himself over while he put his 750 back together but wound up really enjoying it and has begun looking in to making the bike a little more fun for those days when commutes take detours.

So I ask on his behalf, what gearing changes have you made, and what the effect was.
Specifically interested in from a stop, at highway speeds and when cruising around town, as this is going to be mainly a commuter (until I can convince him to make this his dedicated track bike)

Thanks!


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Typical Stripper
 
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January 3, 2006, 11:49 AM

Stock SVS gearing is 15/44 and Stock SV (naked) gearing is 15/45

I did a 14T front sprocket, which in all mathematical senses is within small decimals of 3 teeth up in the rear, just cheaper. Over all effect were much "snappier" throttle responce, and the "feeling" of more power. This gear works well for me as I do 90% twistie road riding, and barely any highway.

At highway cruising speed the effects are that the bike becomes to feel a bit "buzzy" at speed because of the raised RPMs in 6th gear. I have noticed as well with a smaller countershaft sprocket, my chain wore faster, and was not as smooth as lower speeds.

I have a 520 conversion now, 15/47, essentially the same gearing, but it should be a bit smooth because the load is spread over more teeth. Hope that helps for something.


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January 3, 2006, 12:10 PM

I have run 15/47 and 15/46, but only on the track. I was sursprised by the additional grunt. Had never broken the rear end lose before while leaned over and accelerating out of a corner. The rest of my input is not particularly relevant to street riding, so I'll stop there.
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  (#4)
Suddenly Superstitious!!!
 
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Join Date: August 25, 2004
Location: Dulles
January 3, 2006, 12:18 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nudist
Stock SVS gearing is 15/44 and Stock SV (naked) gearing is 15/45

I did a 14T front sprocket, which in all mathematical senses is within small decimals of 3 teeth up in the rear, just cheaper. Over all effect were much "snappier" throttle responce, and the "feeling" of more power. This gear works well for me as I do 90% twistie road riding, and barely any highway.

At highway cruising speed the effects are that the bike becomes to feel a bit "buzzy" at speed because of the raised RPMs in 6th gear. I have noticed as well with a smaller countershaft sprocket, my chain wore faster, and was not as smooth as lower speeds.

I have a 520 conversion now, 15/47, essentially the same gearing, but it should be a bit smooth because the load is spread over more teeth. Hope that helps for something.
1 tooth down in the front = 3 teeth up in the back. (General rule of thumb)

Basically whe you do this you are gearing it shorter. More power off the line but lower top end. Highway cruising is like Nudist says....buzzy.

Spen the money on the rear sproeckt instead of saving on the front. Smaller countershaft does cause much faster wear - meaning you SHOULD then replace the chain and both sprockets. (If you change one of these for wear..then change all....otherwise they are worn and will degradethe newest piece much faster.)

One thing you may or may not notice...a larger rear sprocket will change the angle of the chain to the countershaft sprocket. This can change the rear end suspension feel somewhat. Depends on how you ride.

Enjoy!


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opossum puncher
 
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Join Date: June 9, 2003
Location: Winchester
January 3, 2006, 12:31 PM

Wow thanks for all the info. I will actually apply this to my bike as well, Ive done the RK quick acceleration kit, (520 conversion, down one in the front, and alum rear) I have been agrivated to see just how quickly the rear alum sprocket wore out, and did notice the decrease in smoothness at low speeds, gonna give a Tri-Metal a try for the rear this time round.


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