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Don't Shoot The Horse!
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otb
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Don't Shoot The Horse! - February 26, 2013, 07:03 AM

What I mean is don't throw out your favorite chair or table just because Uncle barney got sloppy drunk and fell against it, breaking a leg.....fix it!

The technique here is for any clean break in a structural (weight bearing) part that (besides the break) hasn't suffered other damage (crushing, ect.). I'm showing an upholstered chair, but the technique is the same for any along-the-grain break:







So now I glue and clamp the break with WOOD GLUE (ONLY!!!) and let it set overnight. When I take off the clamps I still have two issues; the ugly break line where some of the wood is missing, and the structural issue of the glued break. If you are lucky, the break was completely clean and with careful alignment and clamping the break will be almost invisible; if not, it's looks something like mine.

Let's address structure, first:

Here I've drilled two holes through the break at a 90 degree agle and them taken maple dowels of the same size, cut glue grooves in them and glued and hammered them into the holes. When dry, I will have a joint stronger than the surrounding wood:




Now I have a strong but ugly fix: I use a fine-toothed pull saw to cut off the tails of the dowels, sand them smooth and begin the cosmetic repair:




I've added some hardening wood filler (I use and epoxy-based two-part) and some careful staining, now I just need to blend colors and grain:




This antique folding table had two legs broken off by movers; it was restored the same way, but with mahogany dowels:



Riding fast bikes slowly since 1969....
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February 26, 2013, 07:26 AM

Titebond?

Those are some hefty dowels you got thurrr.

Good info, good fix. Nice work
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February 26, 2013, 07:35 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by drz1050 View Post
Titebond?

Those are some hefty dowels you got thurrr.

Good info, good fix. Nice work
Any good quality wood glue will do; just stay away from the epoxies and non-wood specific glues. Wood glues infiltrate the wood fibers and provide strength beyond their own bond. A properly glued wood joint will be as strong if not stronger than the surrounding wood. Some folks like wood biscuits for break fixes, but they do not have the strength of a proper dowel fix.

Depending on where the break is and how much damage, I MIGHT use a polyurethane glue (like Gorilla Glue) if I'm missing some chips from the inside of the break, as it expands as it dries, but I'll use a different technique for bridging the break later.


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↓ dn ʎɐʍ sıɥʇ ↓
 
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February 26, 2013, 10:25 AM

Go home uncle Barney, you're drunk.


-Ryan
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February 26, 2013, 03:43 PM

Good stuff. I love taking broken stuff and making it look like new.
In this age of disposable everything, craftsmenship is a dying art and much appreciated.



“Any man who tries to be good all the time is bound to come to ruin among the great number who are not good. Hence a Prince who wants to keep his authority must learn how not to be good, and use that knowledge, or refrain from using it, as necessity requires”.

- Nicolo Machiavelli 1469-1527

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