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E85
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E85 - March 13, 2007, 02:33 PM

I got this reply from Sheetz. Call them tell them you want it. Gas is already $2.50/gal. E85 is half that.

Quote:
Hello Phil,

Thank you for contacting Sheetz about E85. We are very excited to be
able to bring this alternative fuel to market for our customers. And
we're glad to have gotten the large response from people who want the
fuel. This is great news! Currently, we only offer E85 at three
Pittsburgh area stores.

We are testing at those particular stores to see how we do with
awareness of the fuel and subsequent sale of the fuel before we roll
it
out to any other stores. We completely understand your eagerness to
get
E85 in other places. In fact we get quite a few calls from other
people
wanting the same thing. Until there are enough customers with FlexFuel
cars we can't sell too much of this product. But rest assured that
when
there is enough demand, we will certainly make every effort to sell E85
at as many of our stores as we can.
Eventually Sheetz would like to be able to offer E85 in as many stores
as possible. But customer demand has to make it feasible first. The
high cost of buying, hauling and selling this fuel makes it hard to
offer it so quickly at all 331 of our locations.

I hope this information is helpful. Thank you again for sharing your
interest in getting E85 in your area. We've received quite a few
interested customers in the NOVA area as well as other parts of
Virginia. The more calls we get from interested customers like
yourself, the greater the chances of expanding our sale of E85 beyond
the current stores. If you have any further comments or questions,
please feel free to contact me directly.

Sincerely,

--
Monica R. Jones
Public Relations Manager
Sheetz, Inc.
5700 Sixth Avenue
Altoona, PA 16602
814.941.5183 ofc.
814.327.2338 mobile
814.941.5140 fax
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March 13, 2007, 03:24 PM

You do realize that unless your vehicle (read car, cause there is no motorcycle set up to run this) is a flex fuel car that e85 WILL damage your engine, mainly just the fuel system.


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Last edited by zx6rfool; March 13, 2007 at 03:35 PM..
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March 13, 2007, 03:30 PM

Use in standard engines

Main article: E85 in standard engines
The use of pure E85 in standard gasoline car engines may void the manufacturer's warranty, disrupt oxygenation control in fuel-injected cars, and result in power loss. It may also interfere with proper operation of the catalytic converter.
E85 can also cause engine damage, since prolonged exposure to high concentrations of ethanol may corrode metal and rubber parts in older engines (pre-198 designed primarily for gasoline. In the United States, post-1988 fuel-injected cars are designed to accept E10 fuel, and may be tolerant of higher concentrations of ethanol to varying degrees, usually at least 20%.
Another risk is that of water contamination, which can produce engine wear directly and through corrosive formic acid in the combustion process. Oil and acid neutralizer additives can counteract these risks.
After-market conversion kits, for converting standard engines to operate on E85, are not legal to manufacture in the United States without EPA approval. Converted vehicles also usually require emissions certification, which is often not economically feasible.
Despite these risks, drivers in countries such as Brazil have been converting standard cars to run on "Alcool" (alcohol) for over 20 years (see Ethanol fuel in Brazil) and thorough research has been unable to find documented cases of large-scale ethanol-induced engine failure. Indeed, by looking at the parts list of many American automobiles, (for example, the Ford Crown Victoria) one notices that the regular models and flexible fuel models use the same fuel pumps, fuel lines, etc. Consumers interested in conversion will benefit from their own research on the subject, making sure to consider all local, state, and federal laws.


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March 13, 2007, 03:35 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by zx6rfool
You do realize that unless your vehicle (read car, cause there is no motorcycle set up to run this) is a flex fule car that e85 WILL damage your engine, mainly just the fule system.
Yes I do realze that. I have a flex fuel 5.3l Silverado. I average about 16 mpg. Good thing I only have to drive it once or twice a month. Bad thing there is an Expeditoin sitting next to it that is not flex fuel.

As far as the bike goes, I get 53mpg so its not as big of a concern. I am sure if E85 became a better alturnative bikes would become available.

Another problem with switching to E85 is that it is a solvent and tends break up the varnish and deposits left in your tank from gas. good idea to change your fuel filter after the first few tanks.

Last edited by Space; March 13, 2007 at 03:50 PM..
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March 13, 2007, 03:38 PM

Ahh, nice. Ignore me then. There are some E85 stations near where I am, but my car cant run it.


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March 13, 2007, 03:39 PM

I am not a tree hugger, but there is no reason why whole countries can run E85 and we cannot. Hell we pay farmers not to grow their crops.
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March 13, 2007, 03:41 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by zx6rfool
Ahh, nice. Ignore me then. There are some E85 stations near where I am, but my car cant run it.
Ignore You???? I must have missed something. There are a few public fueling stations in Mont. co. that I know of. Most of the ones in VA are on military bases. If you know of others please point them out.

Last edited by Space; March 13, 2007 at 03:52 PM..
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March 13, 2007, 03:51 PM

Actually there are many reasons why full replacement of gasoline with E85 would be difficult in the US...namely, our vehicle fuel consumption is orders of magnitude more than those countries (e.g. brazil)...there was an earlier thread where I elucidated these reasons...

but we should come up with something...


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March 13, 2007, 03:55 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by boston-birdman
Actually there are many reasons why full replacement of gasoline with E85 would be difficult in the US...namely, our vehicle fuel consumption is orders of magnitude more than those countries (e.g. brazil)...there was an earlier thread where I elucidated these reasons...

but we should come up with something...
Understand. I have been told to expect about a 20% drop in economy. I guess my point is that there are pushing 10 million cars on the road that are flex and it is a renewable fuel source that could reduce our need for foriegn oil.
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March 13, 2007, 04:05 PM

True, but currently ethanol production is energy intensive and that energy has to come from somewhere, so the benefit isn't nearly as good as it seems (e.g. its not an 85% reduction in oil consumption)

personally, I think more nuclear power (e.g. less dependence for electrical generation) and using the waste heat (only really applicable for high temperature advanced reactor designs, e.g. modular pebble bed systems) as the thermal power for ethanol production (e.g. less fossile fuel usage to create ethanol from plant matter) is the way to go.

the distribution infrastructure is virtually in place already, cars are already being configured to run it, and its more energy dense than hydrogen...the problem is growing enough plants...the areas required are enormous (e.g. whole midwestern states)


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March 13, 2007, 04:21 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by boston-birdman
True, but currently ethanol production is energy intensive and that energy has to come from somewhere, so the benefit isn't nearly as good as it seems (e.g. its not an 85% reduction in oil consumption)

personally, I think more nuclear power (e.g. less dependence for electrical generation) and using the waste heat (only really applicable for high temperature advanced reactor designs, e.g. modular pebble bed systems) as the thermal power for ethanol production (e.g. less fossile fuel usage to create ethanol from plant matter) is the way to go.

the distribution infrastructure is virtually in place already, cars are already being configured to run it, and its more energy dense than hydrogen...the problem is growing enough plants...the areas required are enormous (e.g. whole midwestern states)
Slightly over my head. Hey, does it count that my family's dairy farm use to run on shit. I mean methane.
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