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Fed's to Apple: Hey we Hacked your un-hackable iPhone. Apple = We Mad.
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Cool Fed's to Apple: Hey we Hacked your un-hackable iPhone. Apple = We Mad. - March 30, 2016, 01:26 PM

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/apple...072634235.html

I found this kind of funny.
I cant find the thread about Feds wanting Apple to hack the iphone of the San Bern gunman.

Apple said no and gave reason. Fed began to take it to court.

Fed found a way to hack the iPhone.

Feds drop court case.

Apple ask how they hack it?

Feds won't tell exactly.

Apple or tech people mad.

Apple said it will try to tighten up it's security.


Do you think the Fed should tell Apple how they hacked there phone?
By telling that will kill any chance they have at hacking other future criminal phones.


.................................................. .........




The FBI’s announcement that it mysteriously hacked into an iPhone is a public setback for Apple Inc., as consumers learned that they can’t keep the government out of even an encrypted device that U.S. officials had claimed was impossible to crack. Apple, meanwhile, remains in the dark about how to restore the security of its flagship product.

The government said it was able to break into an iPhone used by a gunman in a mass shooting in California, but it didn’t say how. That puzzled Apple software engineers — and outside experts — about how the FBI broke the digital locks on the phone without Apple’s help. It also complicated Apple’s job repairing flaws that jeopardize its software.

The Justice Department’s announcement that it was dropping a legal fight to compel Apple to help it access the phone also took away any obvious legal avenues Apple might have used to learn how the FBI did it. Magistrate Judge Sheri Pym on Tuesday vacated her Feb. 16 order, which compelled Apple to assist the FBI in hacking their phone.

The Justice Department declined through a spokeswoman to comment Tuesday.

A few clues have emerged. A senior law enforcement official told The Associated Press that the FBI managed to defeat an Apple security feature that threatened to delete the phone’s contents if the FBI failed to enter the correct passcode combination after 10 tries. That allowed the government to repeatedly and continuously test passcodes in what’s known as a brute-force attack until the right code is entered and the phone is unlocked.

It wasn’t clear how the FBI dealt with a related Apple security feature that introduces increasing time delays between guesses. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because this person was not authorized to discuss the technique publicly.

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FBI Director James Comey has said with those features removed, the FBI could break into the phone in 26 minutes.

The FBI hacked into the iPhone used by gunman Syed Farook, who died with his wife in a gun battle with police after they killed 14 people in December in San Bernardino. The iPhone, issued to Farook by his employer, the county health department, was found in a vehicle the day after the shooting.

The FBI is reviewing information from the iPhone, and it is unclear whether anything useful can be found.

Apple said that the legal case to force its cooperation “should never have been brought,” and it promised to increase the security of its products. CEO Tim Cook has said the Cupertino-based company is constantly trying to improve security for its users. The company declined to comment more Tuesday.

The FBI’s announcement — even without revealing precise details — that it had hacked the iPhone was at odds with the government’s firm recommendations for nearly two decades that security researchers always work cooperatively and confidentially with software manufacturers before revealing that a product might be susceptible to hackers.

Why the tables just turned on Apple vs the FBIPlay videoWhy the tables just turned on Apple vs the FBI
The aim is to ensure that American consumers stay as safe online as possible and prevent premature disclosures that might damage a U.S. company or the economy.

As far back as 2002, the Homeland Security Department ran a working group that included leading technology industry executives to advise the president on how to keep confidential discoveries by independent researchers that a company’s software could be hacked until it was already fixed. Even now, the Commerce Department has been trying to fine-tune those rules. The next meeting of a conference on the subject is April 8 in Chicago and it’s unclear how the FBI’s behavior in the current case might influence the government’s fragile relationship with technology companies or researchers.

The industry’s rules are not legally binding, but the government’s top intelligence agency said in 2014 that such vulnerabilities should be reported to companies and the Obama administration put forward an interagency process to do so.

“When federal agencies discover a new vulnerability in commercial and open source software — a so-called ‘zero day’ vulnerability because the developers of the vulnerable software have had zero days to fix it — it is in the national interest to responsibly disclose the vulnerability rather than to hold it for an investigative or intelligence purpose,” the Office of the Director of National Intelligence said in a statement in April 2014.

The statement recommended generally divulging such flaws to manufacturers “unless there is a clear national security or law enforcement need.”

Last week a team from Johns Hopkins University said it had found a security bug in Apple’s iMessage service that would allow hackers under certain circumstances to decrypt some text messages. The team reported its findings to Apple in November and published an academic paper after Apple fixed it.

“That’s the way the research community handles the situation. And that’s appropriate,” said Susan Landau, professor of cybersecurity policy at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. She said it was acceptable for the government to find a way to unlock the phone but said it should reveal its method to Apple.

Mobile phones are frequently used to improve cybersecurity, for example, as a place to send a backup code to access a website or authenticate a user.

The chief technologist at the Center for Democracy and Technology, Joseph Lorenzo Hall, said keeping details secret about a flaw affecting millions of iPhone users “is exactly opposite the disclosure practices of the security research community. The FBI and Apple have a common goal here: to keep people safe and secure. This is the FBI prioritizing an investigation over the interests of hundreds of millions of people worldwide.”


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March 30, 2016, 01:28 PM

Apple Wants FBI to Reveal How It Hacked iPhone - The Daily Beast


Apple Wants FBI to Reveal How It Hacked iPhone


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Now that the FBI says it has hacked into an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters, Apple wants the Bureau to reveal how it did it. According to the Los Angeles Times, the tech giant’s attorneys are researching legal tactics to compel the government to hand over details of its hack—information the company deems important for understanding flaws in their product and for protecting consumer privacy. It remains unclear whether the FBI’s hack would work on other iPhones, and a Times law-enforcement source said its applications are limited.


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March 30, 2016, 01:31 PM

Nah nah nah naaaaah, we're not telling you.



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March 30, 2016, 01:31 PM

Malicious hackers don't tell companies or businesses what zero-days or vulnerabilities they find to leverage access into otherwise secured systems. I don't see the US Gov't giving up its red team's tricks.


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March 30, 2016, 01:32 PM

No chance .gov got into the phone. Apple's lawsuit is just a display of how foolish the gov's lawsuit was.
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March 30, 2016, 01:33 PM

I think the FBI should be just as helpful at apple was.


Yeah I am old enough to know better. Thing is, I just don't care.
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March 30, 2016, 01:45 PM

I'm guessing they finally found the password taped to the bottom of a drawer. Seeming mysterious to try and look smart has to be better than admitting they screwed up on a search.


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March 30, 2016, 01:57 PM

Here is what the article said....

Quote:
A few clues have emerged. A senior law enforcement official told The Associated Press that the FBI managed to defeat an Apple security feature that threatened to delete the phone’s contents if the FBI failed to enter the correct passcode combination after 10 tries. That allowed the government to repeatedly and continuously test passcodes in what’s known as a brute-force attack until the right code is entered and the phone is unlocked.

It wasn’t clear how the FBI dealt with a related Apple security feature that introduces increasing time delays between guesses. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because this person was not authorized to discuss the technique publicly.

FBI Director James Comey has said with those features removed, the FBI could break into the phone in 26 minutes.


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March 30, 2016, 02:27 PM

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Originally Posted by t84a View Post
No chance .gov got into the phone. Apple's lawsuit is just a display of how foolish the gov's lawsuit was.
It was a 3 generation old iPhone running a 2 generation old O/S. I'm sure it was less secure than modern iterations of OSX.



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Originally Posted by vonstallin View Post
Here is what the article said....
That's really all the FBI wanted from Apple.

A way to defeat the auto-nuke feature where the phone would wipe itself if someone would type in the wrong PW more than 10x and the ability to inject a rainbow table directly into the password security chip so someone didn't have to manually punch in the code over and over again.

If you could trick to phone into believing it was always on attempt 1, theoretically the FBI would have unlimited failure attempts to break in before hitting finding the right code.



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March 30, 2016, 02:50 PM

Feds shouldn't have to tell Apple anything about how they hacked the iPhone, just like Apple shouldn't have to give the Feds a skeleton key to all of their devices. If they voluntarily want to share with each other, fine, but this demanding access to any information you want sort of stuff is bogus.
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March 30, 2016, 09:00 PM

John Mcafee recently did an interview and spelled it out pretty clearly. They just take the phone apart.

John McAfee 'one way' to hack the iPhone - Tech Insider
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March 30, 2016, 10:16 PM

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Originally Posted by TNT View Post
Feds shouldn't have to tell Apple anything about how they hacked the iPhone, just like Apple shouldn't have to give the Feds a skeleton key to all of their devices. If they voluntarily want to share with each other, fine, but this demanding access to any information you want sort of stuff is bogus.
This is one of those rare occasions on which I sort of disagree with you, but only in part. The Fed should have to reveal to Apple how it hacked Apple's phone. Apple SHOULD NOT have to reveal anything about its phone to the Fed. Here's my reasoning. Apple is not something that our founding fathers saw as a risk to our freedoms. The federal government, on the other hand, is. Our federal government should be minimally involved in our lives. That's what our constitution indicates because that's what our founding fathers intended. The federal government must NOT have carte blanch just because it is investigating terrorism. It should be tasked with protecting the citizens of this nation within constitutional limits and parameters. I'd rather some secrets go un-detected on that damn phone than the federal government seizing property and coercing compliance of its every whim.


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March 31, 2016, 04:08 AM

I agree with OSD here.

If this technology was created that allows this to be done remotely, this has opened pandoras box for illegal search and seizure.

If it is an older OS, it is probably less important as they have several new revisions of security patches.
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March 31, 2016, 06:04 AM

I can't imagine their solution allows remote access since it only let them try unlock codes without erasing the phone. A brute force attack requires they have the phone physically.


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