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Wiring home Ethernet- recommendations
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TNT
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Wiring home Ethernet- recommendations - June 19, 2018, 12:02 AM

Anyone have current recommendations for electricians to wire up a home CAT6 network? 4 to 6 rooms, 2 or 3 floors (depends on cost and impact to home).

Install needs to be clean, no visible holes left in walls, no long exposed runs of cable or conduit, no drywall or other repair needed post install. Doable? Who has had it done and who did you hire?

I'm guessing at cost around 2k for 6 rooms. Or am I dreaming?
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June 19, 2018, 07:54 AM

Though I can personally appreciate hard wired ethernet (I have a server in my basement), wireless has come a long, long way, and is perfectly suitable for almost everything. I've even streamed 4K video over wireless, and I only have a single G1100 router w/802.11ac. A mesh network setup from NetGear or Google is under $400 (sometimes under $300) and should take care of connectivity. Or do you have special requirements for ethernet?
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June 19, 2018, 09:34 AM

The cost will certainly depend on the layout of the home. Some homes have centralized shared walls that allow a single run to feed most of the rooms and some have attic spaces that will allow for a single run that can split out to multiple rooms. The main cost will be how many individual runs will your house need and where in each room did you want the port.

IMO, it would be more cost effective to have the easier runs taken care of and skip the harder runs.

Alternatives would be MOCA (media over coax) and wireless.

For wireless, mesh is great for covering a large area if it's necessary but it's better to get an 802.11ac Wave 2 access point as it allows for simultaneous communication between devices.


-Ryan
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June 19, 2018, 11:20 AM

I have a media server that is connected to our router and distributes 4k video via wireless in our home with no problems. Wiring your home with Ethernet is so last year.


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TNT
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June 20, 2018, 02:11 PM

I guess I am way behind the times.

What should I be looking for with regard to a mesh network?

I did see some data over electrical line products, but read they ha e a lot of issues over time, so what are some good pure WiFi solutions?
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Wiring home Ethernet- recommendations
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Wiring home Ethernet- recommendations - June 20, 2018, 05:03 PM

Another option is ubiqiti but you need a little technical sense to set one up, not hard and many videos out there. I have one in my house and it does fine for all over and most of outside also. 2k sqft home.


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June 20, 2018, 06:16 PM

Ubiquiti for a modern wireless option that would work well in a multistory house. My flashed Netgear w/ 1 node does a good job in my 2 story house, though.

Ethernet over Power adapters for things that wireless doesn't work well for.


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June 20, 2018, 08:14 PM

Powerline ethernet adapters are a waste of time IMO. They work well when the circuit isn't being used but almost any power draw causes throughput to drop and latency to rise.

MoCA is the only substitute for ethernet that I would use in a home (if you aren't using vlans): https://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-Bon...words=moca+2.0

If you're looking at new WIFI options then get a Ubiquiti Unifi NanoHD WAP; you may be able to get away with a single unit depending on where it's placed in your home.


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June 20, 2018, 08:41 PM

YMMV

With circa-2015 EoP units, I had a Cisco ISR router for VoIP and VPN set up on my home network and latency was consistently low/reasonable. I have them repurposed now for connecting in a NUC sandbox node. Again, no issues. Connections had to cross breakers in both cases.

I know older ones had teething problems caused by what you stated. Some home wiring and house types will be more problematic for sure as sources of interference come into play.

EoP, IMO, IS a viable option if you have a suitable use case and physical topology.

Dropping the coin on a solid wireless setup if you are willing to pay for drops is probably what I would lean toward, however...

EDIT:

To answer the OG question on wiring without the need for drywall repair...

It depends on your houses layout and access. Old work gang boxes would help cut down on the need for needless drywall holes. Depending on where the wire is getting dropped from, sometimes an access cut to drill a hole into a stud is just gonna have to happen. If you have any places near where you want drops that are unfinished or have drop tiles, it would make the job easier.

A lot of variables. I just ran some electrical in my house over the weekend for new lighting. Didn't have to open a hole for fishing a new branch into an existing gang box. I am anticipating opening a hole to take an outlet off of the same switch, though...


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Last edited by okayh; June 20, 2018 at 08:49 PM..
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June 20, 2018, 09:34 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by okayh View Post
YMMV

With circa-2015 EoP units, I had a Cisco ISR router for VoIP and VPN set up on my home network and latency was consistently low/reasonable. I have them repurposed now for connecting in a NUC sandbox node. Again, no issues. Connections had to cross breakers in both cases.

I know older ones had teething problems caused by what you stated. Some home wiring and house types will be more problematic for sure as sources of interference come into play.

EoP, IMO, IS a viable option if you have a suitable use case and physical topology.

Dropping the coin on a solid wireless setup if you are willing to pay for drops is probably what I would lean toward, however...

EDIT:

Read all this and felt like high/dumbfounded Ice Cube in Friday.




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June 20, 2018, 11:50 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark View Post
Powerline ethernet adapters are a waste of time IMO. They work well when the circuit isn't being used but almost any power draw causes throughput to drop and latency to rise.

MoCA is the only substitute for ethernet that I would use in a home (if you aren't using vlans): https://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-Bon...words=moca+2.0

If you're looking at new WIFI options then get a Ubiquiti Unifi NanoHD WAP; you may be able to get away with a single unit depending on where it's placed in your home.
MoCA seems like a great idea, because I have coax everywhere I could want a wired Ethernet connection and then some, but in have read that it doesn't work if there are splitters in the path, and I have no way of knowing how many and where they could be in the walls.
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June 21, 2018, 07:28 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by TNT View Post
MoCA seems like a great idea, because I have coax everywhere I could want a wired Ethernet connection and then some, but in have read that it doesn't work if there are splitters in the path, and I have no way of knowing how many and where they could be in the walls.

TNT, I just had my house ran with hard lines using cat 6. I had it run from the basement up. So the basement has 4 rooms hard wired (living room, Playroom/movie room and master downstairs) and then fed upstairs to the master bedroom and the living room. 6 rooms total.

I run a lot of high usage internet applications for work, with video sharing/screen sharing/ license sharing etc. and was determined to have dedicated lines to not have any drop in service.

I was redoing the entire basement so had no ceiling at the time, and ran everything between the joist/ floor boards and up into the walls of the rooms above. Then after all my wires were run (coax, Ethernet, power) I put the up a drywall ceiling. It was a lot of work, and if you plan on having it done while you have finished drywall up they have to either run everything up to the attic and downwards or make cut outs at every other joist and run it through the ceiling and patch the cutouts afterwards... its a lot of work to do it that way and ALOT of money if you are hiring a contractor.

I can tell you without any doubt, as much as its nice to have hard lines everywhere. There is no point of spending the money for something like that when wireless has got as good as it has.

I'm in Annapolis too by the way. If your like me we have Verizon FiOS available with at either 100/100 to 200/200 Mgb download /upload.

Even though my whole house is now run for wired, I use the wireless in the house almost entirely.

Here's is the wireless I bought
https://www.bestbuy.com/site/linksys-max-stream-ac2200-tri-band-wi-fi-router-black/5788100.p?skuId=5788100
This covers over 2000 square feet at 85+ percent optimization meaning at 100/100 you are getting at least 85+ or 170+ for 200/200

I have also used this extender at my office in order to get the maximum range and also its at least 85+ optimized
Here is the extender, and you can further out that coverage quite a bit:
https://www.bestbuy.com/site/linksys-ac1200-dual-band-wi-fi-range-extender-white/4229300.p?skuId=4229300

Honestly, in most cases I am actually nearly 100 percent of what I should be getting using wireless, now I only use the Hard lines for my TVs that were already designed to be where the LAN outlets are that I installed.

Keep in mind I have several TVS and 3 of my tvs are smart TVS and I also stream 4k, 2 laptops 2 workstations and about 10 mobile devices (cellphones/tablets) and have no issues with running several of them at the same time on my wireless network.

Install that wireless in the upper floor, and put an extender if need be at any area that you feel is not getting above 85% bandwidth of what you pay for.

Wired LAN for the most part is now dead, and most electronics no longer even come with wired LAN connections.

Trust me a good wireless will now do the job without the headache and save you several hundred of not more money and also skip all the mess of the contractor.
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June 21, 2018, 07:30 AM

Sorry forgot to mention, don't go with the powerline Ethernet connections, waste of money and actually more drop in bandwidth than any other option.
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June 21, 2018, 11:36 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by TNT View Post
MoCA seems like a great idea, because I have coax everywhere I could want a wired Ethernet connection and then some, but in have read that it doesn't work if there are splitters in the path, and I have no way of knowing how many and where they could be in the walls.
You don't have a junction in your home where multiple coax lines meet at one large splitter?


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TNT
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June 21, 2018, 04:35 PM

Quote:
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You don't have a junction in your home where multiple coax lines meet at one large splitter?

Been looking in between moving and painting, but not found it yet. I'm probably going to start with mesh network and then if I need improvements, try out the MoCA as a backbone for the transceivers. Worst case, it doesn't work and I return it.


Thanks all for keeping me from tearing up my new house for little gain.
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