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Brake line configuration
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Brake line configuration - December 3, 2015, 10:59 AM

I am wondering if there is any advantage or disadvantage to running different front brake line configurations on the track? More specifically the difference between the "original" over the fender style as opposed to the two line configuration.



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December 3, 2015, 12:10 PM

Very interesting....I am a fan of the middle of far right configuration. That is how my R6 and R1 are and IM(dumb)O is easier to bleed and keep consistent pressure on pads as a result.


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December 3, 2015, 12:49 PM

Not sure what the advantages may be for track purposes, but I would think that if you have two separate brake lines running to the MC, if by chance one breaks or snaps, atleast theres some type of pressure in the other one...? Am I correct in this thinking?
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December 3, 2015, 12:54 PM

According to Pascal's law, there should not be any advantage in whichever route you take in accordance to distribution of pressure. However, whichever configuration gives the least amount of fluid (i.e. the shortest amount of line) should give a little better response simply because there is less fluid to move around. I will tell you that having two lines from the MC to each caliper is the BIGGEST BITCH to bleed out, especially during original fill-up/bleeding. The easiest to setup/bleed is a single line to right caliper with a slave line to the left caliper.


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December 3, 2015, 12:56 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by coolkhas View Post
Not sure what the advantages may be for track purposes, but I would think that if you have two separate brake lines running to the MC, if by chance one breaks or snaps, atleast theres some type of pressure in the other one...? Am I correct in this thinking?
That's not how it works. A breach in any one of the lines, in any one of these configurations, would leave to sudden, catastrophic failure.


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December 3, 2015, 01:04 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by superchickencornermonster View Post
That's not how it works. A breach in any one of the lines, in any one of these configurations, would leave to sudden, catastrophic failure.

Reminds be of my conversation with Dodge. What if I rebuilt them wrong, I am not going to really know till turn one.


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December 3, 2015, 02:33 PM

I have the 2 line setup on my FZ1 and the 3 line with the splitter on my Raider. I had the 3 line on my FZ1 before I switched. Frankly, I didn't notice much difference, if any.
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December 3, 2015, 02:46 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by superchickencornermonster View Post
According to Pascal's law, there should not be any advantage in whichever route you take in accordance to distribution of pressure. However, whichever configuration gives the least amount of fluid (i.e. the shortest amount of line) should give a little better response simply because there is less fluid to move around. I will tell you that having two lines from the MC to each caliper is the BIGGEST BITCH to bleed out, especially during original fill-up/bleeding. The easiest to setup/bleed is a single line to right caliper with a slave line to the left caliper.
This is along the lines of what I was thinking, especially the being a bitch to bleed part. Didn't know if people ran the two line configuration in an attempt to give more surface area for some fluid cooling effect. Heard this is done on shock reservoir lines............maybe.


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Several of you know me a "Junior" at the track due to me driving the crash truck at Summit.
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Received MARRC Presidents Cup 2017
Received MARRC Cup 2018
1985 VT1100C Shadow (rebuilt it after 11 years in a shed) And now dead and locked up. Thanks Slider!
1983 G1100I Goldwing (rebuilt it after "only" 4 years in a barn)
1995 XR250R (got this one for free from a friend)
2003 GSXR600 track bike
2000 SV650 race bike
2000 TTR125/150 mini motard (another free one)
2000 CRF150F mini motard
1979 KDX400 (yup, this was free too)
1982 KLT200 (Kermit)
1984 KLT200 (Miss Piggy)
2004 Gas Gas SM450

Yes, they are all still mine and in the garage.


Quote:
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Dinky little rods that flop around make me sad
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December 3, 2015, 02:52 PM

Bleeding for me was relatively simple-open up the bleeders, bungy the brake line to the throttle grip, fill with fluid (leave the m/c lid loose), go to bed. Wake up the next morning, close everything up after adding fluid and then bleed the old fashioned way.
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December 3, 2015, 06:56 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by superchickencornermonster View Post
According to Pascal's law, there should not be any advantage in whichever route you take in accordance to distribution of pressure.
This.
However, the one and only caveat is volume of fluid through the banjo bolts. Two lines from the MC use a single banjo with multiple holes. Think of doubling the fixed orifices on a AC unit. The pressure delta is reduced with the increase in orifice area. Noticeable to us mortals? Probably not.
I'm personally a fan of the Rennsport (on the R6), but had the Type 950 on the Ninja


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December 4, 2015, 06:21 PM

The 2 lines alternate is by far the easiest to bleed in my experience.
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