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Fork seals
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Fork seals - March 10, 2010, 05:45 PM

So from what I've read on here it sounds like it's easier to just pay a shop to replace the seals then to buy the proper tools and do it yourself. The bikes never really had any problems so im not familiar with any local shops, so can anyone recommend a shop thats reasonably priced and does good work?


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March 10, 2010, 05:48 PM

If you are not upgrading internals or anything save the money. It's an easy job that you do yourself with very little effort.

If you need help or want someone else to take care of it contact boomboom929 on here! He's awesome! If you want a full on shop to handle it contact Manassas Honda Kawasaki and ask for Chris (REDLEVEL on here) to do the work!


God Speed Jeff! You'll never be forgotten.

BOOSTZX3 : in all seriousness head injuries ain't no joke. I've had around 10 concussions and now I ride a Buell Don't let it happen to you!
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March 10, 2010, 08:07 PM

man do it your self, its more fun, knoledge and practice you get pays it self.


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March 11, 2010, 12:07 AM

It's a sinch. I also recommended that you service your forks on a regular interval anyway. The fork oil is all nasty after a couple years or 10k (Check w/ Manufacturer though). The other thing is that if your bike sits outside in the weather, the oil seal will begin to rust from the inside out and become very difficult to remove. I've always had to take a torch and carefully heat the leg and pound the crap out of it when the seal has rusted. My other thought on this is... when can a guy have too many tools?
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March 11, 2010, 06:17 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by marc0011 View Post
It's a sinch. I also recommended that you service your forks on a regular interval anyway. The fork oil is all nasty after a couple years or 10k (Check w/ Manufacturer though). The other thing is that if your bike sits outside in the weather, the oil seal will begin to rust from the inside out and become very difficult to remove. I've always had to take a torch and carefully heat the leg and pound the crap out of it when the seal has rusted. My other thought on this is... when can a guy have too many tools?
Interesting ... I've done many a fork seal and I've never had "rust issue" on a rubber fork seal. I just use a $20 seal puller, rag on the tube lip and it pops right out. What kinda bike was this?


God Speed Jeff! You'll never be forgotten.

BOOSTZX3 : in all seriousness head injuries ain't no joke. I've had around 10 concussions and now I ride a Buell Don't let it happen to you!
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March 15, 2010, 08:14 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnySpeed954 View Post
Interesting ... I've done many a fork seal and I've never had "rust issue" on a rubber fork seal. I just use a $20 seal puller, rag on the tube lip and it pops right out. What kinda bike was this?
Marc0011 is right on this... True your seals are circumnavicated by rubber, but trust me on this one, it is in fact metal inside. There are a few aftermarket brands that make them out of all rubber, but mostly they are for shite. Also, a rust problem may also come fromt the retaining ring as well. I've had to dig a few of these out in pieces with quite a bit of frustration, I might add.
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Seals...
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Seals... - March 15, 2010, 08:17 PM

RidinRed....

I did a write up on fork seals awhile back ago. Check this out... If it seems like a bit too much for you to tackle, then give us a call and we'll take care of it for you. www.BrooksCycle.com

Here you go, buddy...


Doing a fork seal replacement can be very messy. Itís a good idea to start off with a clean work area: Smokes are optional.

First, Identify bad seals:
Notice the oil on the shaft. Seals are designed to "Squeege" all the oil off, so any oil is a bad sign. Anothe tell tale is the gathering of dirt/grime around the dust cap. Oil collects this kind of gunk very well.

Suspend the motorcycle safely. You can use pitbull fork stands, although if you work on a lot of bikes like I do, the adapters can be expensive. I have a cherry picker and it works very well:

Remove the calipers by first taking out the two bolts that hold them on to the forks. You can then easily slide off the calipers.


With the RC51, you can remove the fender first, but with the Chicken, you have to wait until the tire is off, so go ahead and remove the tire. There are a few pinch bolts that hold the axle in place as well as an axle bolt. Take the pressure off the bolt side of the axle by removing the pinch bolts on the fork, but leave the pinch bolts in the other side for now. That will hold the axle in place while you crank off the bolt. This particular axle had a problem, and you can see the details for that here ( http://www.monkeyriders.com/forums/v...ic.php?t=13872 ). Once you have removed the bolt, take out the opposing side pinch bolts and remove the axle.

Once you have removed the tire, set it in a safe place keeping in mind all the collars, washer, axle and bolt placement.
Take out all bolts holding the fender on the forks as well as any bolts holding brake line. Remove the Fender:

Loosen all the pinch bolts holding the forks. There are two on the lower section of the tree, one on top and one holding the clip-ons.


The forks should now slide out pretty easily. If you have problems, loosen the pinch bolts more on the clamps and tap lightly on the BOTTOM of the fork with a dead blow hammer. This will free up the fork from its stuck position.
Once the Forks are out, identify the bolt from the bottom of the fork. If you have not already removed the pinch bolts, like I told you to, do that now. Once the pinch bolts are out, you can put a hex on the bolt. It is MUCH better to have a hex socket as opposed to an allen key. Much better leverage. Iíve found that using an impact wrench can save you A LOT of trouble on this. You need to be careful NOT to use a hex that is Ďballí rounded, such as the Craftsman model T-handles. The round hex can strip the hell out of the bolt. I know from experience.

Once the bolt is out, drain all the fluid out. This can get messy. Once the fluid is out, you can remove the dust seal using a small screwdriver.

Then remove the Fork seal retaining ring. Use a small screwdriver to get the ring out of its slot. It will then easily slide up and out.

Once the ring is out, you can now remove the Fork Seal. Iíve found that the easiest way is to grab the shiny part (for all intensive purposes) and the bottom part and pull them apart. The shim below will pull the seal out. When you get it out, make SURE that you notice the order of things. Lay them on a clean towel in the order that they come off and the side up or down that they come off. Hereís the order:
Dust cap, Fork seal retainer, Fork Seal, Washer, Bushing.

Once you get them out, make sure that the bushings donít get lost. This is on the end of the shiny parts inners. These little bastards have a way of getting lost. Make SURE that you have each accounted for. A good way to keep them in place is with a coating of grease:

This is the best opportunity to clean these dingy damn things, so do it now!

The forks go back together in the reverse order. If you donít have fork seal drivers, you can use PVC pipe. With the RC51 (as with most modern sportbikes) the forks are upside down, so you need to cut the PVC in half to use them. Make sure that you replenish the oil in your tubes before reassembly. The ending product is VERY good looking:


The last thing: When you put your brake calipers back on, there are two VERY IMPORTANT THINGS THAT YOU MUST DO!!!
1: Put locktight on the bolts holding the calipers to the forks.
2. More often than not, you need to expand your brake pads to get the calipers back on to the Discs. This creates a gap obviously, so make sure you pump your brakes until pressure builds back up. Or you could be in for a nasty surprise the first time that you go for a test ride. (I know this from experience)
There it is, guys! Enjoy.
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