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How to Replace Fork Seals
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How to Replace Fork Seals - August 4, 2011, 10:45 AM

These may be instructions on how to change fork seals for a GSXR, but the concept remains the same for all sportbikes.
-Adrian

How to Replace the Fork Seals on a 2006 GSX-R750
X
Chris Gilliland

Based out of Spring Hill, Tenn., Chris Gilliland is an avid motorcyclist and has been writing online professionally since 2008. His articles have appeared on various websites, focusing primarily on motorcycle maintenance, safety and technology-related topics. By Chris Gilliland, eHow Contributor updated April 28, 2011
Print this article A puddle of slick fluid formed around the bottom of your 2006 Suzuki GSX-R750's fork legs is a warning that the fork seals have ruptured. These seals are the sole barriers preventing the fork's supply of damping oil from leaking out, which would affect the fork's ability to react to changes in the road's surface and potentially disrupt the front tire's traction. Replacing fork seals is a time-intensive task that requires a few specialized tools and a fair degree of familiarity with the motorcycle's chassis and suspension systems.

Difficulty: Moderately Challenging Instructions

Things You'll Need
  • 5- and 6-mm Allen wrench
  • Flat-head screwdriver
  • Steering head stand
  • 10-, 14- and 24-mm sockets
  • Socket wrench
  • Bungee cords
  • 12-mm combination wrench
  • Soft-jawed vise
  • 24-mm box wrench
  • Spring compressor tool
  • 14-mm open-end wrench
  • Oil pan
  • Suzuki front fork assembling tool
  • Suzuki oil seal remover tool
  • Fork seals
  • Suzuki front fork oil seal installer tool
  • Angled needle-nose pliers
  • Torque wrench
  • Showa SS-05 fork oil, minimum of 30 ounces
  • Fork oil level gauge
Fork Leg Removal
1
Park your GSX-R750 on its side stand. Unscrew the front fender's mounting bolts with a 5-mm Allen wrench. Pull the front brake calipers' hoses out of the hose guide on both sides of the fender, then lift the fender up and out from between the front fork's legs.

2
Pry the plastic trim clips out of the inner fairing panels, placed below the front fairing, with a flat-head screwdriver. Pull the inner panels away from the front and side fairings. Unscrew the lower fairing's bolts with a 5-mm Allen wrench, then slide the fairing out from beneath your GSX-R750.

3
Place your GSX-R750 on a steering head stand to lift the front wheel off the ground; place the motorcycle in a vertical position.

4
Unscrew the front brake caliper mounting bolts from both fork legs with a 14-mm socket and a socket wrench. Lift the calipers off the front wheel's brake rotors and the fork legs, then suspend the calipers from the steering yoke with bungee cords.

5
Unscrew the nut from the right side of the front axle with a 24-mm socket and a socket wrench. Loosen the pinch bolts on the bottom of the fork legs with a 10-mm socket. Push the front axle out from the right fork leg, then pull it out of the left fork leg. Roll the front wheel away from the fork.

6
Loosen the pinch bolts on both sides of the upper and lower fork yokes and the handlebars' pinch bolts, using a 12-mm combination wrench. Pull the fork legs out from the bottom of the fork yokes, using a downward twisting motion.

7
Reinstall the fork legs, once the seals have been replaced, following the reverse method of removal.

Replacing the Fork Seals
1
Place the fork leg in a soft-jawed vise, facing the cap on the top of the fork leg up. Unscrew the cap with a 24-mm box wrench, then pull up on the cap until the fork spring and damper rod have been lifted partially out of the upper fork tube.

2
Push the fork spring away from the fork cap with a spring compressor tool, then loosen the lock nut on the bottom of the fork cap with a 14-mm open-end wrench. Unscrew the fork cap from the adjuster rod held within the fork spring, by hand. Pull the adjuster rod, fork spring, spring retainer and spacer out of the upper fork tube.

3
Remove the fork leg from the vise and hold it upside down over an oil pan to drain the fork fluid. Pump the fork lower fork tube repeatedly until the fork fluid has drained completely. Replace the fork leg horizontally into the vise.

4
Unscrew the pinch bolts from the bottom of the lower fork tube with a 10-mm socket and a socket wrench. Hold the single bolt on the bottom of the fork leg steady with a 6-mm Allen wrench, then slide a Suzuki front fork assembling tool into the upper fork tube. Unscrew the fork's damping rod with the front fork assembling tool, then pull the rod out of the fork.

5
Pull the upper tube away from the lower tube, using the upper tube as a slide hammer, until the fork tubes are separated. Peel the rubber dust cover off the bottom of the upper fork tube, then pry the fork seal retaining ring out of the fork tube with a flat-head screwdriver. Remove the fork seal with a Suzuki oil seal remover tool.

6
Slide the dust seal, followed by the fork seal retaining ring and a new fork seal -- facing the markings imprinted onto the face of the seal outward -- onto the lower fork tube. Slide the lower fork tube into the upper fork tube. Drive the fork seal into the upper fork tube with a two-piece Suzuki front fork oil seal installer tool. Snap the retaining ring over the fork seal and into the channel cut into the upper fork tube, using an angled pair of needle-nose pliers. Push the dust cover over the end of the upper fork tube.

7
Slide the damper rod into the upper fork tube and hold it steady with the Suzuki front fork assembling tool. Screw the damper rod's Allen bolt through the bottom of the fork, using a 6-mm Allen wrench, then tighten the bolt to 25.5 foot-pounds with a torque wrench.

8
Remove the fork leg from the vise and hold it vertically. Push the upper fork tube downward until the entire fork leg has been fully compressed. Pour 14.4 ounces of Showa SS-05 fork oil into the top of the upper fork tube.

9
Pump the damper rod a minimum of 10 times with a Suzuki inner rod holder tool to remove any air bubbles trapped within the fork leg or the fork fluid. Stop when bubbles no longer appear as you pump the damper rod, then compress the fork completely. Fill the fork tube with more SS-05 fork oil until the oil is level with the top of the fork tube. Pump the upper fork tube repeatedly to remove any remaining air bubbles, then allow the fork oil to settle for at least five minutes.

10
Extend the fork completely and measure the distance between the top of the fork tube and the surface of the fork oil with a fork oil level gauge. Ideally, there should be an air gap of 4.41 inches between the top of the fork and the fork fluid. If the air gap is smaller than 4.41 inches, siphon out a small amount of fork fluid and measure the air gap again. If the air gap is greater than 4.41 inches, add small amounts of fork fluid to increase the fluid level.

11
Slide the fork spring, spacer and spring retainer into the fork leg. Pull the damper rod up through the fork spring with the inner rod holder tool.

12
Coat the adjuster rod's O-ring with SS-05 fork oil, then insert the rod through the fork's top cap. Slide the adjuster rod and the top cap over the damper rod, then screw the top cap onto the damper rod, by hand, until it is seated. Tighten the damper rod's lock nut against the bottom of the top cap with a 14-mm open-end wrench. Screw the top cap into the upper fork tube with a 24-mm box wrench.

13
Replace the remaining fork leg's seal, following the method described above.

Read more: How to Replace the Fork Seals on a 2006 GSX-R750 | eHow.com How to Replace the Fork Seals on a 2006 GSX-R750 | eHow.com
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August 4, 2011, 10:48 AM

Good tutorial Wrong section though


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August 4, 2011, 10:55 AM

Why wrong section? It is a technical post.
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August 4, 2011, 10:58 AM

Maybe tips where your other one is.

Good info tho.


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August 4, 2011, 11:00 AM

idc where it goes. I think a tip would be how to ride better or make your bike ride better. How to fix your bike would be technical. If I were looking for posts on how to fix bikes I would go to the tech section. Just my opinion tho. A mod can move it if they want.
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August 4, 2011, 11:00 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sportbike2 View Post
Why wrong section? It is a technical post.
It should be under
HOW-TOs:
Information from our members for other members on how to perform various tasks on your sportbike.


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August 4, 2011, 12:35 PM

I would say that this is not the end all of fork rebuilds.


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August 4, 2011, 01:24 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dodge131 View Post
I would say that this is not the end all of fork rebuilds.
Hence why I said "concept". Please feel free to contribute some positive information rather than just a remark discrediting the information posted.
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