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CrazyMotorcycleGuy
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Plugging a nail hole in a rear tire?
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Can't work my clutch!!
 
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Plugging a nail hole in a rear tire? - April 11, 2010, 08:42 PM

So, um, I got this friend, right, that found a nail in his rear tire. What are your thoughts on using a tire plug for a while on the tire? My, um, friend's tire is nearly new (about 1k miles on it) and he's been driving his car comfortably with a plugged tire for the last year.

I know what the ideal answer is, but what can I realistically expect out of a plugged tire?
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April 11, 2010, 08:47 PM

I have a dunlop qualifier rear tire I can give you. It's seen a day at VIR and 2500 street miles, it still has a lot of life left. Let me know if you want it.


-Mark

2007 Yamaha RVI (sold, treat her nice Chris)

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April 11, 2010, 08:54 PM

Nice! I might take you up on that, Mark, but I'm gonna see how this plug holds up during my commute up and down 66 this week. I hardly go over 50mph on my trip so if it still holds pressure after a few days, I think I should be good.

Last edited by BigDaddyShoo; April 12, 2010 at 11:02 AM..
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April 11, 2010, 09:01 PM

Let me know. I think it's sitting somewhere in Spykers garage...but luckily i have a key to get in


-Mark

2007 Yamaha RVI (sold, treat her nice Chris)

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April 11, 2010, 09:57 PM

Mushroom type plug or sticky cord type?

The stick cord plugs have a bad rap with motorcyclists because a) they tend to fail in some situations, and b) the consequences of a failure can be pretty dire. These plugs don't seal the edges of the hole; they bunch up on top of the hole in a wad of sticky goop inside the tire. This is fine on a car tire in which the rotational forces on the tread are pretty much radial. In a motorcycle tire, the rotational forces tend to slide the goop off of the hole if the hole is not on the center-line of the tread. Even if it is on the center-line, the way the tire flexes can move the goop around if you are aggressive in the curves.

50 MPH on 66? Must not be the section I commute on.
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April 11, 2010, 10:07 PM

Haha thought it was your friend. I have had to use a plug on all my bikes. one I rode a while with (cruder) and I believe it slow leaked on me. From my understanding, the forces, pressures, construction, etc make moto and car tires very different. For example tire life varies, or the fact that a car tire's contact patch doesn't change as much. Add in the fact that you only have one rear tire, and the odds really stack up against you.

I stress on tires because I have had some severe issues in the past with tire incidents. My last rear flat was on a tire with 500 miles on it, used the plug to get me to the shop very gingerly. And I would recommend the same. I wouldn't want to be pushing it and in mid lean when the plug hits the fan...


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April 11, 2010, 10:18 PM

I finished out the last 500 miles or so on a tire with a plug, and it worked fine. However, I kept the bike under the speeds that would qualify as reckless in Virginia. So if your friend can control himself and just use the tire to get around and not break 10 over the limits, he may be ok. He should both watch the tire's air pressure like a hawk and assume the risks of the plug failing. A rapidly deflating rear tire at 70 mph may not be the safest thing in the world. I guess you can put it into dollars and cents. Is your friend's life worth $149.99?


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April 11, 2010, 11:30 PM

Honestly if you go through 4 wheel parts and buy the high end plugs that chemically vulcanize to the tire I wouldn't think twice about it if you prep, clean, and ream it out properly you wont have any issues.

The cheap shit at wallmart and local auto parts stores are crap and can pop out like a cork.

These guys make great stuff.
I know from working in a shop these worked great with off road tires that get aired down on the trails. Patches tend to fail with flexing, heat, and heavy abuse.
http://www.safetyseal.com/store/autokits.htm

I would go with the automotive kit the tools are great in it.

http://www.safetyseal.com/store/atvkit.htm


08 Dizzzer SM
08 Z1000
98 KLR 650

Last edited by Tarded Jake; April 11, 2010 at 11:33 PM..
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April 12, 2010, 10:38 AM

So once I replace the rear tire, is it wise to go ahead and do the front even tho it's it's only got 1k miles on it?

Also, when browsing tires online, what do the ratings codes inside the parentheses mean? I've seen (E), (69W), (73W), etc....
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April 12, 2010, 10:46 AM

Godfather (Gary) and Mike (.com dudes) plugged my rear tire on North Beach ride. They did great job, lifesavers! Its still going strong, but its balder than Mr.Clean so its going to tire heaven. But even with the plug it was fine. After a couple miles the plug gets mashed in and can't feel the difference.
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April 12, 2010, 11:20 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by OrangeShirtDude View Post
Is your friend's life worth $149.99?
Exactly what I was thinking.

I just bought a set of PP 2cts and within 300 miles I got a screw in my rear tire. As much as it sucked paying another $150, I'd rather trust that my tire isn't going to blow at ban-able speeds.
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April 12, 2010, 02:00 PM

Plug it and forget it.


Ill believe corporations are people when Texas executes one.
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April 12, 2010, 02:40 PM

The tire I mentioned above had a nasty little broken glass cut right in the center. Interceptor and I plugged it with a mushroom style plug from his Stop&Go kit. It held up for the last few hundred miles of the tire's life, but it did eventually fail once the tire reached wafer-thinness. Fortunately it went flat overnight in my garage and not out on the road somewhere.


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April 12, 2010, 02:44 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDaddyShoo View Post
So once I replace the rear tire, is it wise to go ahead and do the front even tho it's it's only got 1k miles on it?

Also, when browsing tires online, what do the ratings codes inside the parentheses mean? I've seen (E), (69W), (73W), etc....
No need to replace the front, front is likely to outlast the rear on the street anyway.
Probably those are speed ratings, just get some Bridgestone BT-16's.


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April 12, 2010, 03:21 PM

If plugging the tire makes your "friend" uncomfortable or they aren't the type to check their tire pressures then they should replace the tire.
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