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Tires and Chain/Sprockets Replacement?
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Tires and Chain/Sprockets Replacement? - September 5, 2017, 02:06 PM

So I am planning to replace chain and both sprockets, as well as both tires.

In terms of the order for rear tire, tire should be replaced first and then chain or can be done in any order?

Also, for front sprocket an impact would help better than a breaker bar?

Thanks for any of your help and advice.


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September 5, 2017, 02:22 PM

I doesn't matter but the rear rim and chain are going to off the bike to perform the rear sprocket replacement anyway.

And it is also an nice opportunity to touch up the rear brake caliper. Clean the grunge off the pistons, press them in, and put on new pads.

Use an impact wrench if you have one.

I like to remove all wheel balancing weights, find the true heavy spot on the rim with the tire off but the rotors, valve, and cap installed, install the tire with light tire mark matched to heaviest side of rim, the balance the thing again, putting weights on as necessary.
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September 12, 2017, 07:36 PM

Thanks very much for your advice.

Was curious, do you use regular valve stems(can get from Costco)? Or motorcycle ones are special and different?

Also, I have read that light tire mark can be matched with valve stem and should take care of balancing, is that right?

Thanks again for all the advice and help.


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September 13, 2017, 09:30 AM

It's usually something like a standard 412 stem, something fairly stubby. If you have no balancing stand (I have a basic cone-and-roller bearing one like this:
Black Widow Motorcycle Wheel Balancer with Weights BW-WB-03 | Discount Ramps

you can make do with matching what the tire maker determined to be the light point of the tire to the valve portion of the rim, which should be heaviest point. My feeling is that the rim, with stem, stem cap, and brake rotor(s) already attached, should be put on the balancer before putting on the new tire, to determine what the exact heavy part is of the entire spinning shebang.
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September 13, 2017, 08:42 PM

Get some 83 or at least 90 degree valve stems. They make checking your tire pressures easier.
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September 14, 2017, 04:10 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by phogroian View Post
It's usually something like a standard 412 stem, something fairly stubby. If you have no balancing stand (I have a basic cone-and-roller bearing one like this:
Black Widow Motorcycle Wheel Balancer with Weights BW-WB-03 | Discount Ramps

you can make do with matching what the tire maker determined to be the light point of the tire to the valve portion of the rim, which should be heaviest point. My feeling is that the rim, with stem, stem cap, and brake rotor(s) already attached, should be put on the balancer before putting on the new tire, to determine what the exact heavy part is of the entire spinning shebang.
Thank you again. Indeed it's TR412 one.

Appreciate your advice for balancing too, makes perfect sense.


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September 14, 2017, 04:11 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by beatle View Post
Get some 83 or at least 90 degree valve stems. They make checking your tire pressures easier.
Yeah, I'll look into it to see how long it'll take to receive them. Thanks for the tip.


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September 29, 2017, 04:23 PM

Planning to put a master link for new chain and sprockets, I don't have a vernier caliper. Are there any other advice or tricks for doing it to measure distance? I do have a chain pressing tool to do it.

Thanks for all the help


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September 30, 2017, 08:32 AM

The milder steel of cheap. non O-ring chains wears faster so if you use them you'll find yourself having to make tightness adjustments at shorter intervals to compensate. Nice chains, not really an issue. The big rear sprocket can act as an indicator. When the chain is wrapped around it, the spacing of the teeth as thet sit between the rollers of the chain, at the points where the first and final sprocket teeth to make contact, should still be pretty much dead center, not binding on the rollers. If you are still within 1/2 of the allowable travel of your slack adjusters you should be fine, no caliper measurements necessary.
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October 1, 2017, 09:31 AM

cheap chains are not worth it unless its a low hp bike and you are selling it.
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October 1, 2017, 10:29 AM

I totally agree. It's a false economy... not strong enough to be safe with higher HP bikes, frequent adjustments are a pain, and they reach the wear ("stretch") limit sooner. However, with a thin lubricant, they can be super-slinky, w/ low power loss, and quiet on a low HP (esp. vintage) bike.
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October 1, 2017, 05:08 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by justdance View Post
cheap chains are not worth it unless its a low hp bike and you are selling it.
Absolutely right and well said.

I have JT sprockets and DID chain, so think I am good on that side.

Still haven't gotten to it yet, but plan to do it this week.

Thanks again for all the input and help.


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