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  (#1)
GP Champ
 
ladypink600rr's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,887
Join Date: November 25, 2005
Location: Crofton, MD
Shoei drop - July 15, 2007, 12:40 PM

my kagayama x-11 took a nice spill last week... anyone ever sent their helmet back to shoei to have them take a look at it? I have heard of people sending scorpions back, but not shoei (and I couldnt find anything on the shoei website).

most would say just dropping it wouldn't merit sending it back, but there is a nice lil chunk missing ........ and since this is my track helmet I want to be sure it's gonna be ok

any help is appreciated!
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  (#2)
Track Ho
 
r6hokie's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,818
Join Date: August 7, 2003
July 15, 2007, 01:13 PM

time to retire it and fork up some cash for some new bling


"I am officially retired so please don't ban me"
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What's today? aah fuck it
 
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Posts: 14,163
Join Date: April 30, 2004
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July 15, 2007, 01:59 PM

chunk missing? ...wat tha hell
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  (#4)
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Posts: 16,418
Join Date: June 11, 2003
Location: TROLL WORLD
July 15, 2007, 03:17 PM

wat size is it?
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  (#5)
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Join Date: November 25, 2005
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July 15, 2007, 04:14 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlacKat
chunk missing? ...wat tha hell
lol yup.

couldn't have dropped one of my scorpion helmets noooooooooooo...........


I guess it could be worse..... like if I was wearing it at the time
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ladypink600rr's Avatar
 
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July 15, 2007, 04:15 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnage R1
wat size is it?
small
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  (#7)
( * )|( * )
 
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Posts: 12,837
Join Date: June 15, 2004
July 15, 2007, 07:08 PM

If you cannot find an address try contacting the store you bought it from, usually they have a contact for sending back helmets.

If not, you're better off just buying a new helmet since motorcycle helmets (as far as my understanding goes) are only designed for a single "hard" impact.


Chris
2008 MARRC AM Racer of the Year
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  (#8)
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rhouck's Avatar
 
Posts: 437
Join Date: February 24, 2007
Location: Washington, DC
July 16, 2007, 10:09 AM

Snell Memorial Foundation www.smf.org

I dropped my helmet! Do I have to go buy a new one?

Generally the answer is probably not. Helmets are one use items, but are quite durable otherwise, at least the ones we certify. Frequent dropping or spiking a helmet on the ground, or other hard surfaces may eventually degrade the helmet's performance. Similarly if the helmet falls to the ground at highway speeds unoccupied the owner must be aware that some degradation may have occurred. In general the real damage comes when the helmet contacts an object with a head inside. The Foundation recommends that if you are participating in an activity that requires that you wear a helmet, that you avoid hitting stuff with your head. It can be difficult to readily determine if a helmet has been damaged, and the protective capabilities compromised without a thorough inspection by a trained professional. Some manufacturers may provide this service or direct you to these others that can perform these inspections. The Foundation recommends that if you suspect your helmet may be compromised, then replace it. If the helmet has been involved in an impact while in use, replace it.

How do helmets work?

Helmets are normally comprised of four elements; a rigid outer shell, a crushable liner, chin straps or a retaining system and fit or comfort padding. The rigid outer shell when present adds a load-spreading capability, and prevents objects from penetrating the helmet. It's kind of like an additional skull. The liner, usually made of EPS (expanded polystyrene) or similar types of materials absorbs the energy of an impact by crushing. The chin strap when properly buckled and adjusted along with the fit padding helps the helmet remain in position during a crash.
Helmets work kind of like a brake or shock absorber. During a fall or crash a head is traveling at a certain speed. Since the head has weight, and is moving there is a certain amount of energy associated with the moving head. When the helmet along with the accompanying head impact an unyielding object; a rock, a wall, a curb or the ground the hard shell starts by taking the energy generated by the falling helmet (head) and spreads it over a larger portion of the helmet, specifically the internal foam liner. The foam liner then starts to crush and break which uses up a lot of the energy, keeping it from reaching the head inside. Depending on how fast the head is traveling, and how big, heavy and immovable the object is the faster the head slows down, and the more energy is present. In short everything slows down really quickly. A helmet will effectively reduce the speed of the head by breaking and crushing which reduces the amount of energy transferred to the brain. The whole process take only milliseconds to turn a potentially lethal blow into a survivable one.

Helmet Damage

Assessing impact damage is much more difficult. Cosmetic chips and dings start to appear on many helmets almost as soon as they’re taken out of the box but need not suggest degradation of protective capability. However, broad areas of deep parallel scratches and any broadly distributed pattern of cracks suggests some sort of head impact. If a Snell certified helmet has involved in head impact, it should be retired and replaced.
Sometimes, the impact managing liner of a crashed helmet will feel spongy to the touch. Particularly if it is made of expanded polystyrene (EPS). When the helmet shell strikes an impact surface, it stops moving immediately but the head inside the helmet remains in motion crushing the liner between itself and the inner surface of the helmet shell. As it is crushed, the liner applies controlled braking forces to the head slowing it to a relatively gentle stop. But it takes permanent damage doing so. This damage may be detectable. If an EPS liner feels spongy in some areas and firm in others, the liner has likely been compromised, the helmet should be retired and replaced.
Unfortunately, many helmets will not be visibly affected by impact. Some helmet shells will flex considerably without cracking or splitting. The crush damage to an EPS liner may be at the outer surface, just under the shell so that the inner surface remains deceptively firm. If the helmet was truly impacted, its capabilities have almost certainly been compromised and it should be replaced. Who ever was wearing it knows but there may be no practical way for anyone else to determine its condition conclusively.

Mishaps

If an empty helmet is dropped a few feet from a table top or the back of a bike onto a hard floor or pavement, the impact management is likely unaffected. The shell may be marred, even chipped but, in our experience, there would be no detectable effect in test results. Unless the manufacturer advises otherwise, one such simple fall is no reason to mistrust a helmet. Even so, such mishaps are to be avoided. Helmet damage is cumulative. A history of clumsy handling will destroy a crash helmet eventually.
Deliberate abuse is another matter. Crash helmets are inherently fragile, they protect by taking damage. An intemperate act may render a helmet useless. Anyone who abuses a helmet should be responsible to replace it.


-Ryan

2007 Yamaha R6 (race)
2003 Yamaha R6 (sold)
CCS #341
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  (#9)
PewPew
 
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Posts: 2,858
Join Date: April 29, 2006
Location: A Boat
July 16, 2007, 10:16 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by rhouck
Snell Memorial Foundation www.smf.org

I dropped my helmet! Do I have to go buy a new one?

Generally the answer is probably not. Helmets are one use items, but are quite durable otherwise, at least the ones we certify. Frequent dropping or spiking a helmet on the ground, or other hard surfaces may eventually degrade the helmet's performance. Similarly if the helmet falls to the ground at highway speeds unoccupied the owner must be aware that some degradation may have occurred. In general the real damage comes when the helmet contacts an object with a head inside. The Foundation recommends that if you are participating in an activity that requires that you wear a helmet, that you avoid hitting stuff with your head. It can be difficult to readily determine if a helmet has been damaged, and the protective capabilities compromised without a thorough inspection by a trained professional. Some manufacturers may provide this service or direct you to these others that can perform these inspections. The Foundation recommends that if you suspect your helmet may be compromised, then replace it. If the helmet has been involved in an impact while in use, replace it.

How do helmets work?

Helmets are normally comprised of four elements; a rigid outer shell, a crushable liner, chin straps or a retaining system and fit or comfort padding. The rigid outer shell when present adds a load-spreading capability, and prevents objects from penetrating the helmet. It's kind of like an additional skull. The liner, usually made of EPS (expanded polystyrene) or similar types of materials absorbs the energy of an impact by crushing. The chin strap when properly buckled and adjusted along with the fit padding helps the helmet remain in position during a crash.
Helmets work kind of like a brake or shock absorber. During a fall or crash a head is traveling at a certain speed. Since the head has weight, and is moving there is a certain amount of energy associated with the moving head. When the helmet along with the accompanying head impact an unyielding object; a rock, a wall, a curb or the ground the hard shell starts by taking the energy generated by the falling helmet (head) and spreads it over a larger portion of the helmet, specifically the internal foam liner. The foam liner then starts to crush and break which uses up a lot of the energy, keeping it from reaching the head inside. Depending on how fast the head is traveling, and how big, heavy and immovable the object is the faster the head slows down, and the more energy is present. In short everything slows down really quickly. A helmet will effectively reduce the speed of the head by breaking and crushing which reduces the amount of energy transferred to the brain. The whole process take only milliseconds to turn a potentially lethal blow into a survivable one.

Helmet Damage

Assessing impact damage is much more difficult. Cosmetic chips and dings start to appear on many helmets almost as soon as they’re taken out of the box but need not suggest degradation of protective capability. However, broad areas of deep parallel scratches and any broadly distributed pattern of cracks suggests some sort of head impact. If a Snell certified helmet has involved in head impact, it should be retired and replaced.
Sometimes, the impact managing liner of a crashed helmet will feel spongy to the touch. Particularly if it is made of expanded polystyrene (EPS). When the helmet shell strikes an impact surface, it stops moving immediately but the head inside the helmet remains in motion crushing the liner between itself and the inner surface of the helmet shell. As it is crushed, the liner applies controlled braking forces to the head slowing it to a relatively gentle stop. But it takes permanent damage doing so. This damage may be detectable. If an EPS liner feels spongy in some areas and firm in others, the liner has likely been compromised, the helmet should be retired and replaced.
Unfortunately, many helmets will not be visibly affected by impact. Some helmet shells will flex considerably without cracking or splitting. The crush damage to an EPS liner may be at the outer surface, just under the shell so that the inner surface remains deceptively firm. If the helmet was truly impacted, its capabilities have almost certainly been compromised and it should be replaced. Who ever was wearing it knows but there may be no practical way for anyone else to determine its condition conclusively.

Mishaps

If an empty helmet is dropped a few feet from a table top or the back of a bike onto a hard floor or pavement, the impact management is likely unaffected. The shell may be marred, even chipped but, in our experience, there would be no detectable effect in test results. Unless the manufacturer advises otherwise, one such simple fall is no reason to mistrust a helmet. Even so, such mishaps are to be avoided. Helmet damage is cumulative. A history of clumsy handling will destroy a crash helmet eventually.
Deliberate abuse is another matter. Crash helmets are inherently fragile, they protect by taking damage. An intemperate act may render a helmet useless. Anyone who abuses a helmet should be responsible to replace it.
good post!


R.I.P. Eric "TheIrishGuy"

"Will you carry me down the aisle that final day
With your tears and cold hands shaking from the weight
When you lower me down beneath that sky of gray
Let the rain fall down and wash away your pain"


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  (#10)
Railing!
 
akapero's Avatar
 
Posts: 353
Join Date: April 17, 2006
Location: WV
July 16, 2007, 12:00 PM

They do test them for free, but you'll pay shipping. If it isn't safe to wear, they won't send it back to you. I'd just call or email them directly, they'll tell you how to do it, I'm sure.


Shoei Safety Helmet Corp
3002 Dow Ave. Ste. 128
Tustin , CA 92780
Ph: 714-730-0941 Fax: 714-730-0942
Web: www.shoei-helmets.com
E-Mail: sshc@shoei.com
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