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HOW-TO: Brake Properly
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HOW-TO: Brake Properly - March 1, 2006, 09:25 AM

Motorcycles have two brakes - the front operated by the right hand, the rear operated by the right foot - and both are needed to stop effectively. Below are some important guidelines for braking safely on a motorcycle.

Steps:
1. Use both brakes each time you slow down or stop. If you use only the rear brake, you may never learn how to use the front brake properly when you need it.
2. Squeeze the front brake and press down the rear brake smoothly, gradually increasing pressure as needed. Jerking the front brake or hitting the rear brake hard can cause the brakes to lock up, resulting in skids and control problems.
3. Apply both brakes simultaneously. Many riders believe the rear brake should be applied first. On the contrary, the sooner you apply the front brake, the sooner you slow down.
4. Complete your braking before entering a turn, when possible. If you need to brake when turning, you can use the front, as well as the rear, brake, as long as the road isn't very slippery and you apply the brakes gently - you've less traction available for braking when you're leaning the bike.

Tips:
Remember the front brake provides about three-quarters of your stopping power. It's safe to use in quick stops when you apply it properly.
Some motorcycles have combined braking, which applies both the front brake and the rear brake when you use the rear brake pedal. Check your owner's manual for a detailed explanation.

Warnings:
Jamming the front brake hard on a slippery surface can be hazardous. Squeeze the brake lever cautiously on wet or icy roads. And begin applying the brakes sooner than you normally would.

Overall Warnings:
Motorcycling is an inherently dangerous activity that can result in serious injury or death. We recommend that you seek proper training and equipment before attempting this activity.

Tips from eHow Users:
Hard braking by Chris Selway
Many inexperienced bikers fall off when braking. Modern bikes have front brakes that can stand the machine on its nose. Practice braking hard on an empty road before you have to do a real emergency stop. You should be able to momentarily lock the front.

Braking on wet surfaces by Rob
As previously stated, the front brake does 75% of the stopping work, allowing the bikes weight to shift forward. On slick surfaces this can cause a tail-spin. You want to apply the rear brake first, then the front brake. That keeps the back end behind you. On a dry surface, apply the brakes evenly. Allow for proper reaction time when following behind others. Dry surface - 2 second rule. Wet surface - 5 second rule. Ride aware, and ride safe!



http://www.ehow.com/how_5251_brake-p...otorcycle.html
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March 1, 2006, 09:47 AM

wow thats usefull, when I asked jim last year his answer was
1. See God
2. Then Brake
Thanks buddy.
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March 1, 2006, 10:03 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harvey_TT600
wow thats usefull, when I asked jim last year his answer was
1. See God
2. Then Brake
Thanks buddy.
Yea, Kevin Schwantz was known for that method too. It's a tough philosophy to live by but can help with lap times! haha. The only changes that need to be made, I think, is that "When the front brake locks up, release it immediately. When the rear brake locks up, just keep stopping."

Now just sit back and wait for the 20 "well at the track..." posts.
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March 8, 2006, 12:48 PM

The ratio for cruisers is like 75 - 30 for stopping power, but sport bikes is more 90 - 10.

This how to is pretty old and needs to be revised.

And should you lock the front, you want to GENTLY roll off the front brake until the front is no longer sliding then you GENTLY apply more brake. Letting go could cause the bike to low side as you are quickly loading the rear and unloading the front of the bike. You want to be smooth EVERYWHERE, especially on the street.

One last rule, CONTINUE to look where you want to go. This is the most forgotten rule when some one brakes hard.


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September 11, 2006, 03:55 PM

When applying the brakes hard when approaching a corner can nose dive the front end.
Apply the front brake a little to settle the front end and then once settled apply harder braking.


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September 11, 2006, 04:13 PM

No, it should be one input. Hard braking should always be one input and smooth.


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September 11, 2006, 04:14 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by n2sport
When applying the brakes hard when approaching a corner can nose dive the front end.
Apply the front brake a little to settle the front end and then once settled apply harder braking.
Que?



Harv, I thought I said wait ‘till you see Elvis.

Ivan, got to disagree with you on one point buddy. If the front wheel locks up you are on your way to the ground with a quickness. The only thing you can do wrong at that point is not let go of the brake lever fast enough. Then gently reapply.


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September 11, 2006, 04:17 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by WKDBLD
Que?



Harv, I thought I said wait ‘till you see Elvis.

Ivan, got to disagree with you on one point buddy. If the front wheel locks up you are on your way to the ground with a quickness. The only thing you can do wrong at that point is not let go of the brake lever fast enough. Then gently reapply.
What are you saying by Que?

A Twist of The Wrist II page 104 one of the side notes says and I quote.
"Grabbing it too hard, too quick upsets the bike. Pull it, let it settle, then hard, then light at the end."

You don't want a hand full of braking entering a turn either, you want to already be coming off of it and then throttle controls come into play and we all know throttle settles the bike and is good in the corner...


To punish and enslave!
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2008 HD Night Train
religion is just a misspelling of superstition

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi
Once again I forgive you for your self-righteousness, bigotry and prejudice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stillie View Post
I'll also thank them for proving that you don't need the force to get a woman to make you a sammich.
"They who would give up an essential liberty for temporary security, deserve neither liberty or security."
-Benjamin Franklin
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYpOF...embedded#at=36
http://www.bachbio.com/gunsavelives.htm

Last edited by n2sport; September 11, 2006 at 04:41 PM..
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September 11, 2006, 04:48 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harvey_TT600
wow thats usefull, when I asked jim last year his answer was
1. See God
2. Then Brake
Thanks buddy.
Dammit Harvey its Accelerate till you see GOD then brake!!!
Wait till YAOMATT sees this thread. Each bike and rider do it differently But there are guidelines that are general. Each situation is different but if you do not practice In all situations you will go down when you least expect it! If you are new to riding please find someone that as some skill that you trust and have them help you out.


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September 11, 2006, 04:54 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dodge131
Dammit Harvey its Accelerate till you see GOD then brake!!!
Wait till YAOMATT sees this thread. Each bike and rider do it differently But there are guidelines that are general. Each situation is different but if you do not practice In all situations you will go down when you least expect it! If you are new to riding please find someone that as some skill that you trust and have them help you out.
The problem with 1 input of hard and smooth as explained by Keith Code is that it is 1) Too much and risk locking the front or 2) Isn't enough and you are gradually getting more and more and at the end you have a hand of of brake and now here is the turn. Now letting off of all that brake and trying to now lean and get back on the gas is completely wrong for a smooth cornering technique.

That is why they want you to work towards not having a lot of brake by the end and get most of the speed down in the beginning.

Now we are also making this extremely simplified. Proper suspension setup so that the suspension doesn't bottom out is necessary, not being stiff and being relaxed body position not suddenly too far forward on and on.


To punish and enslave!
2003 GSXR1K
2008 HD Night Train
religion is just a misspelling of superstition

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi
Once again I forgive you for your self-righteousness, bigotry and prejudice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stillie View Post
I'll also thank them for proving that you don't need the force to get a woman to make you a sammich.
"They who would give up an essential liberty for temporary security, deserve neither liberty or security."
-Benjamin Franklin
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYpOF...embedded#at=36
http://www.bachbio.com/gunsavelives.htm

Last edited by n2sport; September 11, 2006 at 04:57 PM..
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September 11, 2006, 04:54 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by cbrf4269
The ratio for cruisers is like 75 - 30 for stopping power, but sport bikes is more 90 - 10.
Cool, cruisers have 105% braking ability, I'm getting one


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September 11, 2006, 05:14 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by n2sport
What are you saying by Que?

A Twist of The Wrist II page 104 one of the side notes says and I quote.
"Grabbing it too hard, too quick upsets the bike. Pull it, let it settle, then hard, then light at the end."
That sounds very strange to me. Probably more important in all of this for someone that is newer to riding is to keep your arms loose and squeeze the tank with your knees. This will reduce the nose dive and weight transfer to the front wheel. The bike will squat more than dive.
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September 11, 2006, 05:16 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xechs
Cool, cruisers have 105% braking ability, I'm getting one
Damm You got that right I am picking up a vrod 2nite!


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September 11, 2006, 06:11 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by rddy
That sounds very strange to me. Probably more important in all of this for someone that is newer to riding is to keep your arms loose and squeeze the tank with your knees. This will reduce the nose dive and weight transfer to the front wheel. The bike will squat more than dive.
Hey, I don't pretend to be Rossi. I am just telling what I read from a pro that I assume no one here is going to argue with.
I don't know why it sounds strange. Actually to me it makes sense.
Just like in the same book it talks about how giving the bike gas actually raises the rear, doesn't make it squat like many would think. It goes against what I know a car to do but again who am I to argue with Keith!


To punish and enslave!
2003 GSXR1K
2008 HD Night Train
religion is just a misspelling of superstition

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi
Once again I forgive you for your self-righteousness, bigotry and prejudice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stillie View Post
I'll also thank them for proving that you don't need the force to get a woman to make you a sammich.
"They who would give up an essential liberty for temporary security, deserve neither liberty or security."
-Benjamin Franklin
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYpOF...embedded#at=36
http://www.bachbio.com/gunsavelives.htm
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September 11, 2006, 07:13 PM

Don't lock your elbows when hard braking...that transfers the weight shift to the bars which in turn unsettles the bike. Keep your elbows slightly bent and as others said squeeze with your legs so that the weight transfer takes place evenly...also scoot back a little instead of putting the weight on the tank.

Also...very very important is not to squeeze the brake without loading the front wheel first...without any weight, the front tire will skid and you could crash.

If the front does slide (trust me on this one I've already done this a few times) let go as fast as you can to recover!!!

Last but not least...don't ride faster than you're capable of braking...for example...if you routinely ride 100mph...make sure you are comfortable hard braking from that speed. If not...slow down! And practice panic stops several times a year...it could save your ass sometime.

I'll shut my noob ass up now!!!


Chris
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