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HOW TO: Install Grip Heaters and Badass switch on the KTM 690 SMC (no 56K)
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HOW TO: Install Grip Heaters and Badass switch on the KTM 690 SMC (no 56K) - February 27, 2010, 03:49 PM

As seen on supermotojunkie...

Items used in this install:

  • 2008 KTM 690 SMC, >Clicky<
  • Symtec Motorcycle Grip Heaters (PN 210019MT), >Clicky<
  • Water-proof center-off switch for boating applications >Clicky<
  • Electrician multi purpose tool >Clicky (pdf)<
  • Motorcycle grip cement >Clicky<
  • Multimeter (not necessary now that you have my how-to )
  • Black electrical tape (RadioShack or equivalent)
  • Zip ties (RadioShack or equivalent)
  • Heat shrink (RadioShack or equivalent)
  • Hair dryer or heat gun for the heat shrink (Target or equivalent)
  • Electrical wire, 14-16 gauge or so (RadioShack or equivalent)
  • All-weather spade-type electrical connectors, red or blue (RadioShack or equivalent)
  • Science lab spatula >Clicky<


Some commentary about the list:
  • The 690 SMC has what KTM calls supplemental equipment connectors behind the headlight. Remove the headlight, and you'll find two pairs of all-weather female spade connectors. One pair is hot all the time, and the other is controlled by the ignition switch. Both are 10-amp circuits, and you can use either. However, just remember to turn your shit off if you decide to use the hot-all-the-time circuit. I used the ignition-dependent circuit in this installation.
  • The 690 SMC has some empty space behind the left frame cover, just behind the steering head and coolant reservoir, perfect for housing the boat switch. You just need to cut the rectangular hole with a dremel and exacto knife. If you have a smaller switch, you can cut the hole on top, adjacent to the ignition switch. Just make sure to check how far up the seat comes before cutting.
  • The Symtec heaters are nice because they have two elements in each pad for accomplishing the Lo/Hi function. You don't need to include any resistors into the circuit. The downside I suppose is that you have to be more creative about adding a rheostat (variable control). If you wish to have a rheostat, I recommend just putting it into the Hi circuit because I don't think you need to trim any heat out of the Lo circuit. My current configuration will not run on Hi indefinitely. I'm not blowing the 10-amp fuse, but the circuit shuts off and stays off until things cool down. So I only run on Hi until the grips are hot, and then I drop down to Lo. Then I run periodically run on Hi for short stints as needed.
  • The switch indicator LEDs do not work exactly as I had hoped. Both lights come on when the switch is in either position, and this is stupid but not a complete loss. More on this below in the step-by-step.
  • If you do any electrical work at all, the VACO No. 19730 tool is a must-have. This particular multi purpose electrician's tool is the best, IMO. This one is hard to find while the crappy ones are ubiquitous.
  • If you don't have an assortment of science/research lab spatulas, get some. These are sooooo useful. I listed above because they are perfect for breaking the glue on existing grips that have the bar end cut out. Just run the spatula in and all around, and you'll be able to work the grip off. This of course is an alternative to compressed air, which I do not have at home (I use a bicycle tire pump for tires and someone else's compressor when I need to seat beads).


Ok, LLLLLLLET'S GET READY TO RUMBLE!

STEP 1: Read this. It's about grip heater installations: >Clicky< This shows a nice little trick for managing the risk of having the wires yanked away from the elements. I did not run a zip tie through my grip, however, because I did not want to feel the head of the zip tie on my hand. I have photos of my configuration below. Remove the seat and take the left front plastics and frame cover off.


STEP 2: Get set up. I rolled my bike into my basement where it was warm. First, however, a path had to be cut throw the 20" of snow.



My cute friend Michelle (photo identity withheld from you animals to protect the innocent ) helped me dig the path through the yard around to the basement door and helped with the early stages. She also tolerates (I think ) my painfully methodical approach to DIY. Thanks Michelle!!!




STEP 3: Grips work. Take your grips off and clean up the insides if reusing and clean the bar (clutch side) and throttle tube with brake cleaner or equivalent. Don't use something like WD40 that will leave a greasy film. Wrap the bar on the clutch side with electrical tape so that the element is insulated from the bar. I used three layers. You want to keep the amount of heat that is conducted from the element, to the bar, and out to the atmosphere to a minimum. However, you also need to keep the outer diameter from expanding too much because you still need to slide a grip on over all of it, including the heating element pad. Put the adhesive-backed grip pads in place according to how you want to route the wires, add a film of grip lock, and install the grips over the elements. I don't have photos of the process because they can be found elsewhere. Here's my final outcome, clutch side:



...and throttle side:




STEP 4: Locate supplemental connectors. Remove the headlight assembly by removing the bolts on either side and disconnecting the quick-connectors for the turn signals and headlight. The supplemental equipment connectors will be obvious. There are two pairs, one is hot all the time, and the other is hot when the ignition switch is on (regardless of kill switch position).



The constant-on pair looks like this (red test lead marks the pos/hot wire):



The ignition-controlled pair looks like this (red test lead marks the ground wire, the black/red wire is pos/hot, and I had my test leads wrong in this photo):




STEP 5. Bring the juice. Decide which you want to use and connect a wire (red, in the Symtec kit) that will carry juice to your switch. Also attach a wire (black) to ground the circuit, and cover both with heat shrink before attaching the connectors on the switch side. I used all-weather male spades with the plastic housing cut off to insert into the bike's ignition-controlled supplemental connectors:



Send the cable rearward along the same route as the clutch line:



All your wiring will travel along the clutch line to just behind the steering head. Just follow other things when routing the cables from the grip heater elements. Put some heat shrink around the two cables coming from the grip heaters where they meet behind the headlight assembly before crimping on any connectors. You should now have something that looks like this:






STEP 6: Switch it up. It's time to install connectors and wire everything to the switch. The boat switch I used has 5 pairs of male spades on the bottom of the switch.

Here is what the switch looks like:



Here's where it's going:



Here's a crappy, homemade illustration that hopefully helps show how to wire the switch:



To orient yourself to this diagram, imagine that the switch is already installed in the side of the left front frame cover with the red led closest to the front wheel. Now you are looking through the frame from the right hand side of the bike at the back of the switch.

Here are some photos of the switch being wired and completely wired:







I used white wire for both jumpers from the throttle-side Lo and Hi wires because I didn't have any blue wire for staying color-consistent. The reason you need these jumpers is to power the LEDs from the circuit you close with the switch. It's best to wire everything up like I show above before inserting the switch into the frame cover. Test your configuration and make sure everything works. Then you can disconnect the switch, install it into the frame cover, and reconnect as you reassemble the bike.

Testing:






I hit the character number limit for a single post so this is continued below.


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February 27, 2010, 03:51 PM

(continued)

STEP 7: Install the switch. Measure the box housing to figure out what sized hole you need and mark it out on the frame cover. I didn't take photos of this process because I think it's fairly straightforward. Make your big cuts with a dremel + thin cut wheel. Finish the job with an exacto knife. I made the rectangle undersized with the dremel and then painstakingly enlarged it with the exacto in small increments until the switch just barely fit through. This will ensure that you have a snug, secure fit.

Here's what it looks like installed (you couldn't possibly ask for a better match to the bike):





There's plenty of clearance with the fork tube and triples:



Here you see how the cables are routed along the clutch line. It's tight but not too tight:



I'm pretty happy with how this turned out. Plus the switch is within easy reach yet completely out of the way and protected from bumps and other hazards.





I've tested in soaking ran, ice, salty snow melt, and have had zero issues. Like I said though, you can't put it on Hi and forget about it because the circuit will shut off until it cools down.



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February 27, 2010, 04:11 PM

Nice write up!Very detailed so you ready for me to bitch? First do not use electric tape. It will break down over time very quickly and start to rotate. I used shrink tube and on 5 bikes never had a fail. Second on the throttle side at the plastic part next to the grip you should notch it and do not use a zip tie. Let the wires be free to move. Anytime you tie wrap wires that tight they will break.


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February 27, 2010, 04:26 PM

I looked for large-diameter heat shrink but couldn't find any and was too lazy to order. I wasn't crazy about the electrical tape either. At any rate, I don't expect all of this to last forever.

About the zip ties on the cables: The three wires attached to the grip elements are encased in thick heat shrink so they are not kinked at the point at which they are tied. Second, I left slack in the throttle side so that there is not pulling against the cinch point. Finally, I did not crank down on those cinches so I expect them to hold up fairly well.

The components of this configuration that'll probably die first are the KTM grips because they have super-soft compound on the outer surfaces that wears faster than a rain tire on a sunny summer afternoon.

I wired everything such that it is modular and easy to remove. I may invest in another bar, grips, and throttle tube so that I can swap out for the warm season.


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February 27, 2010, 07:12 PM




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whoa preppy......
 
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February 27, 2010, 08:30 PM

excellent.


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February 27, 2010, 09:04 PM

Very nice work. Looks very pro.

How many miles do you have on your bike now? Have you done a service/oil change yet? I'm getting ready to do this and it looks painful.
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February 28, 2010, 07:53 AM

Thanks guys. Witold, I have ~3600 on the new gauges (installed the day before I bought it) so that's about 10,000 miles total. I did one oil change so far at ~2800 (new odometer) and used Repsol synthetic. The oil change is not that bad. Dodge gave me one tip that is crucial. To remove the filters, lightly tap a long wood screw with enough force to pierce the metal base of the filter, screw it in a little, and pull on the head of the scew with pliers to extract the filter. I cleaned the screens in kerosine and then blew them out with compressed air. Didn't take any longer than what my 10r takes.


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February 28, 2010, 09:14 AM

That's a cleeeeean install When I saw it last weekend I almost thought it might be stock.
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February 28, 2010, 09:39 AM

Nice. Good job on the install.
Wonder if I should post my very clean install of symtec grip heaters and driving lights and Cig lighter plug and heated gear connection on my 07' CBR600RR . Cig plug and switches all installed on a black tiny panel up on the left triple clamp. Every circuit protected by fuses. All of it is easily reversible back to factory. Es nice!. No cutting into ANY body panels, tapping into harness, etc was done and almost all wires hidden, except at the panel but it looks like factory installed wires.

Boat marine stores have some really good stuff you can pick up to do these types of projects. The stuff is also made for extreme conditions. You can go to radio shack to pick up LED lights to show when the circuit is on if you need them.

Eh highly doubt I'd get any feed back if I posted it. Folks don't want to read threads about motorycle stuff. lol

Last edited by Trireme; February 28, 2010 at 09:48 AM..
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February 28, 2010, 10:47 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trireme View Post
Nice. Good job on the install.
Wonder if I should post my very clean install of symtec grip heaters and driving lights and Cig lighter plug and heated gear connection on my 07' CBR600RR . Cig plug and switches all installed on a black tiny panel up on the left triple clamp. Every circuit protected by fuses. All of it is easily reversible back to factory. Es nice!. No cutting into ANY body panels, tapping into harness, etc was done and almost all wires hidden, except at the panel but it looks like factory installed wires.

Boat marine stores have some really good stuff you can pick up to do these types of projects. The stuff is also made for extreme conditions. You can go to radio shack to pick up LED lights to show when the circuit is on if you need them.

Eh highly doubt I'd get any feed back if I posted it. Folks don't want to read threads about motorycle stuff. lol
Create a thread! You know how you eat a whale? One bite at a time. We need to take this site back from it's slant toward funnyobamabonertube.com one technical thread at a time. I for one am very interested in the extra lighting you installed because I'm thinking about doing the same thing. HID doesn't work well on the SMC because it has no projector light.


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February 28, 2010, 04:03 PM

John I installed these on my ZRX1200 and have been on for 5 years now. Trust me heat shrink tube is the way. BTW I have some at my shop in DC numbnuts could have asked!


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October 21, 2011, 10:01 AM

Bump. Is RnR Cycles running their special on these again this year? It's fun to do your own stuff, but their deals on the kit and installation in the past have been killer. If I had to do it over again, I'd take my bike to RnR.


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October 21, 2011, 11:26 AM

nice write up

yeah it would be a nice addition for my bikes too. I gotta get better headlight for the 510, took it out last night and I couldn't believe how ill dimmed the stock light was.


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October 21, 2011, 11:40 AM

Did the electrical tape ever break down on you? I only ask because mine did in grand fashion


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