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HOW-TO: Lift a Motorcycle
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HOW-TO: Lift a Motorcycle - March 1, 2006, 12:07 PM

http://www.dps.state.mn.us/mmsc/late...mid=32&scat=27



Technique I: Facing Away from the Motorcycle - For Large Motorcycles Preferred Method for any Size



1. Turn the handlebars to full-lock position with front of tire pointed downward.

2. Find the "balance point" of the two tires and the engine, engine guard, or footpeg. The motorcycle will be fairly easy to lift until it reaches this point because it's resting on its side. Once you start lifting from there, you are responsible for the most of the weight of the bike.



3. "Sit" down with your butt/lower back against the motorcycle seat. Be very careful to keep your back straight and your head up. Put your feet solidly on the ground about 12 inches apart, with your knees bent slightly.

4. With one hand, grasp the handgrip (underhand, preferably), keeping your wrist straight.



5. With your other hand, grip the motorcycle framework (or any solid part of the motorcycle), being careful to avoid the hot exhaust pipe, turn signals, etc.

6. Lift with your legs by taking small steps backwards, pressing against the seat with your butt and keeping your back straight. On slippery or gravelly surfaces this technique probably won't work. On inclined surfaces this can be very dangerous.



7. Be careful not to lift the motorcycle up and then flip it onto its other side! If possible, put the sidestand down and the bike in gear.

8. Set the motorcycle on its sidestand and park it safely.



Technique II: Facing the Motorcycle - For Small and Medium-Sized Motorcycles Regular Method

1. Turn the handlebars to the full-lock position with the front of the tire pointed skyward.



2. Find the balance point of the two tires and the engine, engine guard, or footpeg. The motorcycle will be fairly easy to lift until it reaches this point because it's resting on its side. Once you start lifting from there, you are responsible for the most of the weight of the bike.

3. Stand very close to the handlebars. Plant your feet about shoulder-width apart with the lower handgrip in between them. Use both hands to lift. Keeping your back straight and your head up, lift carefully, keeping the handgrip close to your body. Use your leg muscles for power, and not your back muscles.




4. Be careful you don't lift the motorcycle up and then flip it onto its other side.

5. Set the motorcycle on its sidestand and park it safely.
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March 1, 2006, 01:25 PM

That looks alittle like WeeMan in that picture only this guy is taller.


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