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How-To-Needed... Painting PLASTIC gas tank
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How-To-Needed... Painting PLASTIC gas tank - February 26, 2007, 12:48 PM

Anyone have any experience painting a plastic gas tank... I have an aftermarket one - that's a tad faded... As I understand it - painting them can be a lesson in futility.. As the gas tank fumes will cause the painting to peel and stickers to come off...

I have heard about Krylon Fusion.. I have also heard about using bedliner/rhino liner... etc...

Anyone have any experience doing this...

bueller... bueller

thanks in advance..............


-Jason
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Last edited by hondahawkrider; February 26, 2007 at 12:50 PM.. Reason: crappy spelling
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February 26, 2007, 01:19 PM

Scuff with 400 sandpaper
Prime
paint
clearcoat
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February 26, 2007, 02:38 PM

If you can get the fumes out of the tank for the actual painting, use clear nail polish in addition to clear coat on any surfaces near fumes or gasoline. That should prevent peeling.


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February 26, 2007, 02:43 PM

questions for you,

what type of paint are you thinking of using?

are you going to use proffesional spray gus and a conpressor?

are you using a regular garage, spray booth or maybe painting outside?

I painted proffesional for 10 years so I know a little thing or 2 about painting.


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February 26, 2007, 02:48 PM

I've had mixed luck with the Krylon Fusion. My only real advice is do EXTRA, EXTRA, EXTRA surface prep. You can do it all twice, and still not have it done enough.

I'd put an extra coat or two of primer down b/c of the fumes.


The DR guys I know that've done it have also had mixed results. They all followed the EXACT same steps and some had peeling over time, and some ran for years without any issues. Same tanks, paint, process.

Best of luck!


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February 26, 2007, 02:50 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chico
questions for you,

what type of paint are you thinking of using?

are you going to use proffesional spray gus and a conpressor?

are you using a regular garage, spray booth or maybe painting outside?

I painted proffesional for 10 years so I know a little thing or 2 about painting.
Don't know yet... Looking for suggestions....

Basically what I have is an oversized Plastic gas tank for longer range.. It's in perfect shape - but it's faded and off white as it's been used for a time... I honestly don't care what color I use - or how it gets on the tank... Spray/RattleCan, Compressor, Booth, etc... I just want the paint to stay on it... I have heard of issues where the gas fumes of a plastic tank will cause all kinds of paint issues..... I would even be ok with Line-x or Rhino Liner - if I knew the stuff would stay on..... (sorry am painting noob)

Some folks have used the Krylon Spray on stuff with sucess - some say it doesn't work - etc... I was just trying to find someone I can ask some questions or follow a procedure that works...


-Jason
DAMN Rider DAMN Rider

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February 27, 2007, 06:48 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by hondahawkrider
Anyone have any experience painting a plastic gas tank... I have an aftermarket one - that's a tad faded... As I understand it - painting them can be a lesson in futility.. As the gas tank fumes will cause the painting to peel and stickers to come off...

I have heard about Krylon Fusion.. I have also heard about using bedliner/rhino liner... etc...

Anyone have any experience doing this...

bueller... bueller

thanks in advance..............
PM yzfrone regarding the Krylon. I've seen his stuff and it looks good to me.
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March 2, 2007, 07:55 AM

you will want something with an adhesion promoter to make sure it doesn’t lift, and a top coat/clear coat that has a catalyst in it to make sure its hardened enough not to break down if it comes in contact with gasoline.
  1. I would use a red scotchbrite pad to scuff the existing paint surface to create a tooth for the primer.
  2. wipe it down with wax& grease remover
  3. spray a thin coat of primer followed by a second full coat. and let it cure/dry completely
  4. sand primer with 600grit wet paper and use a tack cloth to wipe it down to remove any dust or overspray particles
  5. spray a thin dusting of your color base immediately followed by a second normal coat.
  6. Let those coats tack up (rattle cans dry quickly so it may be ok to just start back at the beginning immediately... just make sure it doesn’t look wet).
  7. spray one last light coat and let it dry/cure completely.
If you're going to keep going and use a clear coat, make sure its from the same paint system (or you could get bleed) and continue:
  • lightly wet sand 800 grit, use tack cloth and wipe down with wax & grease remover
  • spray a spot underneath out of sight to get a feel for how its going to react (runs, bleed, dries too quickly, etc).
  • adjust to compensate and spray one quick dusting immediately followed by a nice thick coat. Let that dry completely (will probably take 2 or 3 times as long as the primer and base coats). you can use a medium even heat to speed this up.
  • You can leave it as is, or wet sand with 1000-2000 grit paper and buff it once its cured
don’t rush anything and take your time... if you're like me and start out good and slow but get impatient by the end and speed through it you will run coats and likely have to sand it down and start over.

You can, with practice, create some very nice and reliable paint jobs with store bought rattle cans. You are however limited to pre-made paints and might not have the option to use additional chemicals and colors, change drying times, add hardener, or use compatible paint systems. You're also limited to a round spray pattern which isn’t ideal for even coverage. It is however much cheaper than using professional grade urethanes or enamels through a spray gun.


hope that helps you some. Let me know if you want some help or guidance, or maybe once i get some other projects done i can paint it for you with my equipment. (Ed i haven’t forgotten about your stuff)


'04 CBR1000RR and lots of Volvos (and now a new Tundra for hauling them around when they all break)
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March 2, 2007, 08:03 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by boostdemon
you will want something with an adhesion promoter to make sure it doesnít lift, and a top coat/clear coat that has a catalyst in it to make sure its hardened enough not to break down if it comes in contact with gasoline.
  1. I would use a red scotchbrite pad to scuff the existing paint surface to create a tooth for the primer.
  2. wipe it down with wax& grease remover
  3. spray a thin coat of primer followed by a second full coat. and let it cure/dry completely
  4. sand primer with 600grit wet paper and use a tack cloth to wipe it down to remove any dust or overspray particles
  5. spray a thin dusting of your color base immediately followed by a second normal coat.
  6. Let those coats tack up (rattle cans dry quickly so it may be ok to just start back at the beginning immediately... just make sure it doesnít look wet).
  7. spray one last light coat and let it dry/cure completely.
If you're going to keep going and use a clear coat, make sure its from the same paint system (or you could get bleed) and continue:
  • lightly wet sand 800 grit, use tack cloth and wipe down with wax & grease remover
  • spray a spot underneath out of sight to get a feel for how its going to react (runs, bleed, dries too quickly, etc).
  • adjust to compensate and spray one quick dusting immediately followed by a nice thick coat. Let that dry completely (will probably take 2 or 3 times as long as the primer and base coats). you can use a medium even heat to speed this up.
  • You can leave it as is, or wet sand with 1000-2000 grit paper and buff it once its cured
donít rush anything and take your time... if you're like me and start out good and slow but get impatient by the end and speed through it you will run coats and likely have to sand it down and start over.

You can, with practice, create some very nice and reliable paint jobs with store bought rattle cans. You are however limited to pre-made paints and might not have the option to use additional chemicals and colors, change drying times, add hardener, or use compatible paint systems. You're also limited to a round spray pattern which isnít ideal for even coverage. It is however much cheaper than using professional grade urethanes or enamels through a spray gun.


hope that helps you some. Let me know if you want some help or guidance, or maybe once i get some other projects done i can paint it for you with my equipment. (Ed i havenít forgotten about your stuff)
WOW... thats some great info... I greatly appreciate - this also matches up with this page - http://www.4strokes.com/tech/plastic_restore/ - which I got sent.. It's good to know somone who has done it...

Thanks a Million...


-Jason
DAMN Rider DAMN Rider

Maybe you have to be messed up... before you can step up!
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March 2, 2007, 10:07 AM

Wow boostdemon... that writeup makes me wish I had some bike parts that need painting. Great detail!
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March 3, 2007, 12:15 PM

Glad you like it.. glad someone confirmed it too (i tried not to miss anything lol).

heres an example, sorry ive never done a bike with rattle cans, but this whole engine bay was painted with dupont rattle can paints:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 1025157410_G.jpg (191.3 KB, 19 views)


'04 CBR1000RR and lots of Volvos (and now a new Tundra for hauling them around when they all break)
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March 14, 2007, 12:02 AM

i forgot something very important that most people dont remember or know;

step 0: warm and shake your rattle cans. if they're kept outside and its cold, warm them up inside for a day before you paint something (or it will splatter and run like crazy). The other thing is shake it well.. then when you're ready... shake it more. you never know how long its sat on the shelf at the hardware store. shake it while you're painting too.

when you're done painting, if you still have plenty of paint left in the can that you're planning on keeping - turn the can upside down and spray all the paint out of the straw inside. then remove the cap, wipe it clean as you can, and tap it out. That will keep it clean and usable for many months.


'04 CBR1000RR and lots of Volvos (and now a new Tundra for hauling them around when they all break)
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