DCSportbikes.net  
» Help Support .NET!
DCSportbikes Premier Membership for 25$ per year. Discounts! Click here for full information.

Now available in the .NET Shop:



Get your DCSBN Gear!
» Shoutbox
Sorry, only registered users have the ability to use our real-time shoutbox to chat with other members.

Register now, it's free!
» Online Users: 504
2 members and 502 guests
2blueyam, boomboom929
Most users ever online was 4,519, September 2, 2015 at 03:26 AM.
Go Back   DCSportbikes.net > Brand Specific > Supermotoz/Offroad

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools
Drank some SUMO Kool Aid but now I've got some questions...
Unread
  (#1)
MSF Student
 
Knucklehead's Avatar
 
Posts: 94
Join Date: June 12, 2006
Location: Springfield
Drank some SUMO Kool Aid but now I've got some questions... - April 27, 2011, 08:44 AM

I guess this could be in riding tips too but since my ?s are sumo specific I'm posting them here...

Coming from mostly a sportbike riding background, is there anything I need to watch out for on the sumo that the sportbike may be a little more forgiving when making small "mistakes"? Specifically inputs to the bike/ handling etc... (pls limit answer to asphalt for now...)

On the flip side what small "mistakes" do I have more wiggle room with on the sumo?


http://i38.tinypic.com/29ypfnk.jpg

“Security is mostly a superstition…Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.” - Helen Keller
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#2)
GP Champ
 
ladypink600rr's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,887
Join Date: November 25, 2005
Location: Crofton, MD
April 27, 2011, 08:55 AM



STFU NOOB

  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#3)
MSF Student
 
Knucklehead's Avatar
 
Posts: 94
Join Date: June 12, 2006
Location: Springfield
April 27, 2011, 08:59 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ladypink600rr View Post


STFU NOOB



http://i38.tinypic.com/29ypfnk.jpg

“Security is mostly a superstition…Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.” - Helen Keller
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#4)
ಠ_ಠ The Cleaner ಠ_ಠ
 
Posts: 2,691
Join Date: August 10, 2010
Location: Ft. Wayne, IN
April 27, 2011, 09:06 AM

I'll wait for the guys who have been riding both types of bikes much longer than I have get in here, but I'm pretty sure almost everything is more forgiving on a sumo than a sportbike except being able to get back up to speed if you slow down too much in a corner haha

With a more upright body position, and much longer suspension travel, the bike can play around a lot more than a sport bike can and the generally lower speeds allow for more room for error. Plus when you wreck chances are the bike is going to be fine since the entire body is basically a frame slider.

Since the bike is also set up for dirt riding, it has to be much more accommodating of rapidly varying track conditions, so when you're on asphalt the sumo is ready for whoops and ruts but hopefully those don't happen haha


Whenever a post needs posting, I appear, then I'm gone.
  Send a message via AIM to Send a message via AIM to hokierider  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#5)
GP Champ
 
Posts: 2,038
Join Date: January 22, 2009
Location: Swanton, MD
April 27, 2011, 09:23 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by hokierider View Post
I'll wait for the guys who have been riding both types of bikes much longer than I have get in here, but I'm pretty sure almost everything is more forgiving on a sumo than a sportbike except being able to get back up to speed if you slow down too much in a corner haha

With a more upright body position, and much longer suspension travel, the bike can play around a lot more than a sport bike can and the generally lower speeds allow for more room for error. Plus when you wreck chances are the bike is going to be fine since the entire body is basically a frame slider.

Since the bike is also set up for dirt riding, it has to be much more accommodating of rapidly varying track conditions, so when you're on asphalt the sumo is ready for whoops and ruts but hopefully those don't happen haha

I think you're selling yourself short. I have been riding tards and sportbikes for about 13 years and I think you hit the nail on the head with that post.
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#6)
Derpentine Dealer
 
OrangeShirtDude's Avatar
 
Posts: 12,464
Join Date: April 6, 2007
Location: "Going Bonkers"
April 27, 2011, 09:27 AM

After my crash in January which resulted in a broken left wrist, I'm advocating for everyone to consider putting a steering stabilizer on their supermoto. The reason is that the bars stick out far and when they hit the pavement, the snap back into your wrist on the opposite side of the impact. THAT is what broke my wrist, the bar whip upon impact with the pavement. Go with Scotts--they are the best in terms of both product and service. Other than that, maintain your brakes, do your scheduled maintenance, and ride it like you stole it.


How's my posting? Please direct all concerns and inquiries to DCSBN's chief content manager, Hollywood, via PM.
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#7)
Get Tarded!
 
Tarded Jake's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,925
Join Date: June 19, 2009
Location: Las Vegas
April 27, 2011, 09:28 AM

OSD would be the person I would seek, or post up on super moto junkie...


08 Dizzzer SM
08 Z1000
98 KLR 650
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#8)
Get Tarded!
 
Tarded Jake's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,925
Join Date: June 19, 2009
Location: Las Vegas
April 27, 2011, 09:29 AM

Speak of the devil.....


08 Dizzzer SM
08 Z1000
98 KLR 650
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#9)
The last urrbendah
 
Stillie's Avatar
 
Posts: 18,909
Join Date: February 5, 2003
Location: Kickin' it with Stevie Janowski
April 27, 2011, 09:35 AM

Having raced and ridden both, I'll say hokie and OSD are on the money.

Probably the biggest change you'll notice is the larger effect small inputs have on the bike. Bars give you more leverage than clipons so smaller changes have bigger results.


13 KTM 200 XC-W
15 KTM 350 XC-F

I might have a dirt bike problem.
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#10)
ಠ_ಠ The Cleaner ಠ_ಠ
 
Posts: 2,691
Join Date: August 10, 2010
Location: Ft. Wayne, IN
April 27, 2011, 09:43 AM

not much is forgiving at this point though:



Whenever a post needs posting, I appear, then I'm gone.
  Send a message via AIM to Send a message via AIM to hokierider  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#11)
GP Champ
 
Posts: 2,038
Join Date: January 22, 2009
Location: Swanton, MD
April 27, 2011, 10:54 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by hokierider View Post
not much is forgiving at this point though:

Man I am so ready for friday!!!! Being my first outing on the new sumo I'm betting lots of crashing will be happening.
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#12)
GP Champ
 
windblown's Avatar
 
Posts: 3,953
Join Date: June 17, 2006
Location: Shenandoah Valley, VA
April 27, 2011, 11:12 AM

It's a lighter bike with a long suspension. It's going to "move" around a lot more. Let it.

As far as crashing and getting hurt. Wrestling with even just a couple hundred pounds of steel that has suddenly decided to go rogue is almost always a loosing propostion. You can fight back on a light bike better than a heavy one but when you're going down for the count - Let go!

The longer suspension takes some getting used to for most. Unlike a tightly sprung and damped sportbike heavy braking makes drastic changes to the bikes geometry. This is not an issue if your smooth, just like you should be on a sportbike, but as I mentioned earlier, lots more movement and that can take a bit to get used to.

Silly stupid easy to ride. You'll be doing things without thinking about it that you'd have a much harder time purposly doing on a sportbike.

If you don't have any dirtbike experiance be aware that the front end of these bikes will slide out before the rear does if you don't keep your ass towards the front. It's much easier to control a slipping rear than a sliding front in my limited experiance.

Disclaimer: I'm just an ordinary rider with no extraordinary skills. So if you can get hooked up with someone that has a lot of experiance listen to them! I just like the smile that being on two brings to my face.
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#13)
GP Racer
 
Gots_a_sol's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,477
Join Date: March 11, 2011
Location: Charles Town, WV
April 27, 2011, 11:15 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by windblown View Post
If you don't have any dirtbike experiance be aware that the front end of these bikes will slide out before the rear does if you don't keep your ass towards the front. It's much easier to control a slipping rear than a sliding front in my limited experiance.
.
Quote:
but when you're going down for the count - Let go!
Indeed. Just go down with the ship, it is cheaper in the long run than this:



combo of inexperience, not being up on the tank (or anywhere near the front of the seat for that matter), sticking a foot out to save it and being fat lol

Plenty of other people were falling down without breaking things, I just got unlucky I suppose.


-Joe

17 Beta 250RR/RE
09 Husky WR177

Last edited by Gots_a_sol; April 27, 2011 at 11:24 AM..
  Send a message via AIM to Send a message via AIM to Gots_a_sol  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#14)
ಠ_ಠ The Cleaner ಠ_ಠ
 
Posts: 2,691
Join Date: August 10, 2010
Location: Ft. Wayne, IN
April 27, 2011, 12:13 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by REDLEVEL View Post
Man I am so ready for friday!!!! Being my first outing on the new sumo I'm betting lots of crashing will be happening.
It ain't a crash until the handle bar hits the ground haha


Whenever a post needs posting, I appear, then I'm gone.
  Send a message via AIM to Send a message via AIM to hokierider  
Reply With Quote
Unread
  (#15)
You meet the nicest
 
WKDBLD's Avatar
 
Posts: 5,601
Join Date: June 3, 2003
Location: Alexandria
April 27, 2011, 12:46 PM

I've only put a 1000 miles on my sumo so far, but one thing that's different is how sensitive it is to fore & aft body position. You really need your nuts up on the tank for good handling in corners. Then for braking you need to slide, or at least lean, back. Otherwise the rear wheel will leave the ground while being out braked by a Buick. Sliding back may also be needed for acceleration depending on traction. This is for aggressive riding.

For commuting, I mostly stay slid back in the "braking position" which also happens to be the naturally comfortable cruising position. The forward position is not uncomfortable (ymmv) but just seems overly aggressive for riding around town. Sort of analogous to being in a tuck on a sportbike.

The bike (Husky 450SM) is not super confidence inspiring in a fast corner when sitting back on the seat. Sliding up completely changes that. Sometimes I'll slide up for a highway ramp if there are no cars ahead. Bonus if sliding forward also pops your elbows up, making you ready apply your Cornerspin Kung Fu.

btw - something I've really liked about commuting on the sumo is that it feels like I'm getting a low level but very sport specific core body workout. Building a dirtbike worthy body was something of a goal for me. Pretty much out of time now though since my "big event" is this Sunday


BECAUSE I GET OFF ON IT!
  Send a message via AIM to  
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
vBulletin Skin developed by: vBStyles.com
All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner. The comments are property of their posters, all the rest © 2002-2010 by DCSportbikes.net. DCSportbikes.net is owned by End of Time Studios, LLC.